Tag Archives: Research-Based Teaching Series

RBTS #4: International Communication in the Classroom

Led by: Sheila Schulte 
Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Locations:
Cumming Campus | 246
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Dunlap-Mathis 137
Oconee Campus | SRC 581

How do we can we best assist non-native speakers of English in the classroom setting? This session is devoted to sharing model practices to ensure a positive learning environment for a diverse student body. After a basic review of intercultural communication theory, there will be a panel discussion with UNG international students, followed by an open discussion.

To register for workshops, please fill out our Workshop Registration form or email rsvp.ctll@ung.edu.

RBTS #3: Teaching Ethics Across Disciplines

Led by: William Black
Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Locations:
Cumming Campus | 246
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Dunlap-Mathis 137
Oconee Campus | SRC 581

Many of us believe teaching ethics is important, but how do we know if we are making progress? The ARBC instrument (Action Research into Business Conduct) provides a measuring tool that can be used to diagnose current levels of perceptions about ethics, or used as a pretest / posttest evaluation of whether ethics instruction is effective. ARBC is a free online tool, created at the University of North Georgia that can support action research efforts to improve ethics instruction. The scenarios it asks participants to evaluate are drawn from common everyday situations that may have ethical implications. ARBC can be useful in contexts beyond business courses, for example in confirming assurance of learning measurements of progress towards ethics awareness goals.

This session will illustrate how to use ARBC in ethics assessment, and provide examples of ongoing research that is being conducted using ARBC.

To register for workshops, please fill out our Workshop Registration form or email rsvp.ctll@ung.edu.

RBTS #2: Critical Reading and the Use of Lecture Outlines in Teaching Freshmen Classes

Led by: Carl Ohrenburg
Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Locations:
Cumming Campus | 246
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Dunlap-Mathis 137
Oconee Campus | SRC 581 Because of a scheduling conflict, Oconee participants will attend in Administration 108.

Critical Reading is an essential skill for our students, yet we often spend little time on helping them develop it. The way one reads a particular text varies widely depending on content and audience and students often lack the skill set to read certain types of writing. To address this, lecture outlines have been developed for use with teaching General Chemistry courses to college freshmen. These outlines represent a first step in developing critical reading skills in the sciences and provide a template for students to incorporate textbook reading with in class material. They are designed to help the students organize the content, as well as, engage the textbook on their own. This presentation will introduce the concept of the lecture outlines and explore their effectiveness in teaching General Chemistry.

To register for workshops, please fill out our Workshop Registration form or email rsvp.ctll@ung.edu.

RBTS Series #1: Serious Gaming, Serious Learning

Led by: Tam Spike, Renee Bricker, and Victoria Hightower
Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Locations:
Cumming Campus | 246
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Dunlap-Mathis 137
Oconee Campus | SRC 581

“Serious gaming” in the classroom is growing in popularity. Serious games can take many forms: computer games, board games, puzzles, etc. This presentation will focus on role-playing games and simulations. Within these games, students take on roles informed by historical sources and/or current events. There is no fixed script, no predetermined outcome. Students are guided by the philosophical and intellectual beliefs of the people they have been assigned to play, and seek to achieve their goals in papers, speeches, other kinds of public presentations, or subrosa alliances and other machinations. Gamification of difficult, complex, real-world situations reinforces concepts, creates greater engagement, and provides multiple means of approaching course material as well as develops skills in speaking, writing, critical thinking, problem solving, leadership, and teamwork.

To register for workshops, please fill out our Workshop Registration form or email rsvp.ctll@ung.edu.

Research-Based Teaching Series: Best Practices for Significant Learning in the Flipped Classroom


Wednesday, March 7, 2018
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Best Practices for Significant Learning in the Flipped Classroom
Led by Sarah Formica, Associate Professor of Physics

There’s more to a flipped classroom than reading assignments and pre-lecture videos. Students need to engage with the material, each other, and their instructor to have significant learning experiences. This workshop will provide you with the opportunity to experience a flipped classroom, as well as tools and strategies you can use to flip your own. There will be a pre-workshop assignment and group activities during the workshop, so come prepared and ready to engage.

 

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 246
Dahlonega Campus | Dunlap Hall 211B
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 3211
Oconee Campus | 318

Research-Based Teaching Series: Cooperative Discussions for Critical Thinking

Workshops offered at the following locations: Blue Ridge Campus 107, Dahlonega Campus Hansford Hall 312, Gainesville Campus Nesbitt 5105, and Oconee Campus in SRC 564
Wednesday, February 21, 2018
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Cooperative Discussions for Critical Thinking
Led by Danielle Hartsfield, Assistant Professor of Literacy and Elementary Education

Sometimes students in small group discussions don’t generate the kind of deep, critical thinking that instructors desire. This workshop will teach participants how to scaffold text-based small group discussions to promote critical thinking and student engagement with texts in face-to-face and online settings (including D2L).

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564

Research-Based Teaching Series: Digital Natives Lost in the Forest of Google

Digital Natives workshop for faculty offered at these locations: Blue Ridge 107, Dahlonega, Hansford 312, Gainesville, Nesbitt 5105, and Oconee SRC 564Wednesday, October 25, 2017
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Digital Natives Lost in the Forest of Google
Led by Austina Jordan, Associate Professor of Library Science/Collection Management Librarian

There is no shortage of information in the world. Fake news abounds or so we are told. If you google “Fake News” you get 164,000,000 hits. If you search that same term in Galileo you get 465,331 results. What’s the difference? Why does it matter? Research is an integral part of the academic journey. Teachers design research based assignments with numerous objectives in mind. This session will help professors understand how students actually research, how they understand research assignments and what they do for help in the process.

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564

Research-Based Teaching Series- Smoothing the Transition: Helping Your Freshmen Adjust to College Work

Smoothing the Transition Workshop for faculty offered on Blue Ridge 107, Cumming Campus 262, Dahlonega Hansford HAll 312, Gainesville Campus Nesbitt 5105, and Oconee Campus in SRC 561Led by Steve Pearson, Assistant Professor of English

Monday, September 11, 2017
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

This workshop will present retention issues that can be addressed early in students’ coursework and will ask faculty to brainstorm solutions. Obstacles with research, not understanding expectations, retention problems, and students’ backgrounds are all difficulties that students face. Because of all of these issues can be addressed, and hopefully prevented, by faculty, this presentation will ask faculty to consider ways that we can address them in first-year courses.

 

 

 

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564

Register here.

Is Blended Learning a Viable Option?

Blue Ridge Campus | 107
Cumming Campus | 262
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | 564

Facilitator, Diana Edelman
Presenter, Jennifer Schneider

Part of the Research-Based Teaching Series

Research has shown that human interaction is linked to positive student experiences. However, human interaction is not confined to the classroom. Motivating students to engage in the course material earlier in the education process could lead to richer learning experiences. This workshop will discuss whether blended learning is a viable option in modern classrooms.

This workshop is presented on all campuses via video teleconference.

Effectively Responding to Student Writing

Blue Ridge Campus | 107
Cumming Campus | 246
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | 564

Facilitator, Diana Edelman
Presenters, Molly Daniel, Matthew Boedy, and Jim Shimkus

Part of the Research-Based Teaching Series

Molly Daniel, Matthew Boedy, and Jim Shimkus will show examples from their own student feedback, as examples of effective and ineffective marks. This workshop will also address how to use effective feedback to counter the long slog of composition courses. In short, having more effect with less comments. We will discuss how writing center tutoring aids in your view of feedback and offer a handout that can you refer to for better feedback.

This workshop is presented on all campuses via video teleconference.

Everyone Can Teach Writing: Three Constructs to Engage Students in Deep Learning

Blue Ridge Campus | 107
Cumming Campus | 262
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | 581

Facilitator, Diana Edelman
Presenters, Jim Shimkus and Anita Turlington

Part of the Research-Based Teaching Series
Jim Shimkus and Anita Turlington will explain the relevance of the three constructs (and associated practices/activities) as high-impact teaching practices that help to enhance student learning and development. These practices are helpful not only for those college teachers who are focused on teaching writing, but teachers in any discipline who are interested in strategies to enhance student learning.

This workshop is presented on all campuses via video teleconference.

Statistics: It’s Not Just for STEM Anymore!

Wednesday, October 5, 2016
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Presented by Gina Reed, Professor of Mathematics
Co-sponsored by the Research-Based Teaching Series (RBTS) and CTLL

Statistics: It’s Not Just for STEM Anymore! Conduct Research in ANY Discipline Using Statistical Analysis


Gainesville Campus | Watkins Building 182

The scholarship of teaching and learning provides important data for effective classroom instruction methods at the university level; these data are supported by statistical research not only in STEM fields, but also in the humanities. This one-hour statistics workshop is designed to support the research of all faculty and will provide important methods and tools for conducting quantitative research in the classroom. This research can, potentially, develop into publishable scholarship in the areas of teaching and learning.

The workshop and companion workbook will explain and guide the participants through several statistical methods useful to research with instruction on how to perform the data analysis using the statistical software package, Minitab. No statistical background is required. Included topics are:

  • Graphing distributions
  • Shapes of distributions
  • Measures of central tendency
  • Measures of variation
  • Best choice for central tendency and variation
  • Bivariate data regression analysis
  • Hypothesis Testing

RSVPs are required as class size is limited to 14. Please do not use the registration link! Instead RSVP to rsvp.ctll@ung.edu with the following subject line: “Statistics Workshop 10/5.” Questions about content can be directed to Gina Reed @ Gina.Reed@ung.edu.

Research-Based Teaching Series: Literature Is an Ally: Reading War in the Classroom and Community

Wednesday, September 7, 2016
12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m.

Blue Ridge  Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | |Hansford Hall 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564

Kristin Kelly, Associate Professor of English, will discuss her work with “Talking Service,” a national reading and discussion program for servicemen and servicewomen coming back to civilian life from the war zone. As faculty at a premier military college, all of us have veterans in our classrooms. Kelly’s talk will help us serve these students better through understanding what they experience as well as what resources can help them, including “Talking Service.”

The program is based on the text Standing Down: From Warrior to Civilian edited by Don Whitfield of the Great Books Foundation and includes essays, short stories, and poems spanning more than 2,500 years. Participants read and discuss selections on themes such as Caregiving, Civilians and War, Combat, Confronting the Enemy, and Family Relationships.

Sometimes the soldiers relate the evening’s reading to their own military experiences. Sometimes it’s all about the text. The Georgia Humanities Council sponsors Kelly’s program in Buford, GA, with textbook support also provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Please join us to learn how to better serve our student veterans.

This event will be video teleconferenced to all campuses.
Click here to register.

Research-Based Teaching Series: The Assets and Liabilities of Rubrics

Monday,  March 7, 2016
12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m.

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 246
Dahlonega Campus | Barnes 315
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 2214
Oconee Campus | SRC 530

Michael Rifenburg and Jim Shimkus will present their research on rubrics.  Starting with a historical foundation, we will chart how rubrics fell out of favor in common student writing assessment practices.

This session will be streamed from the Gainesville Campus.

Clicking on this text will lead to the workshop registration form.

Teaching without Borders: Integrating Cross-Disciplinary Strategies in the Classroom

Cumming Campus | Room 246
Dahlonega Campus| Barnes 315
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 2214
Oconee Campus | Classroom 304

Anastasia Lin and Sheri Hardee  present their research and practice on cross-disciplinary techniques in the classroom. They will discuss the value of team-teaching. In addition, they will offer their insights on implementing service-learning in this learning community.

Anastasia Lin is the Assistant Dean of Student Research and Scholarship and Associate Professor of English. Sheri Hardee is the Associate Dean of the College of Education and Associate Professor of Education.

This event is part of the Research-Based Teaching Series, facilitated by  Diana Edelman-Young, CTLL Faculty Fellow and Assistant Professor of English.

All faculty & teaching staff across disciplines are invited to this session.