The Center for the Book

There are many crucial programs and administrations that are vital to our nation and its literacy growth that we may not even know existed. A prime example of this is the Center for the Book. I had never heard of this administration until I dove into research for Library Lovers’ Month and discovered the significance of the Center for the Book. If you are like me, you probably have no idea what the Center for the Book is or what it does, but no worries! Let’s the face the unknown and uncover what the Center for the Book truly is.

The Center for the Book is an administration that is under the Library of Congress. It promotes reading, literacy, literature, and literacy growth. It was established by public law in 1977 by Dr. Daniel J. Boorstin, the Librarian of Congress, and there are affiliate centers established in all fifty states. The Center for the Book’s goal is to be carried out internationally, so in order to complete this goal, more than eighty programs have been deemed as partners to promote the Center for the Book in the United States and globally.

There are also various ways the Center for the Book promotes reading and literacy. The Center for the Book has created various programs, such as events, contests, lectures, and festivals as motivation for others to read and write and be more involved in literature. The Georgia Literary Festival is held in various cities across the state of Georgia, such as Blue Ridge and Augusta. These festivals celebrate the local authors and hold various activities for guests to participate in.

The contests that the Center for the Book administer usually have cash prizes, which is pure genius on their part. Nothing gathers people quite like money! It’s also genius because cash prizes draw in students, especially college students. When college students hear the word “cash,” they’ll likely listen to whatever is being promoted, and the students are more willing to participate in order to win the cash prize (especially if it’s a contest that is free to partake in) because, let’s face it, almost all college students are broke. That’s why it’s genius to hold contests with prizes because people are more likely to participate in them, which promotes reading and writing at the same time, so it’s a win-win situation for all parties involved.

It’s surprising that a lot of people, including myself, don’t know what the Center for the Book is or that it even existed! If it weren’t for the Center for the Book, our libraries wouldn’t be like they are today. I shudder at the thought of what they would be if it weren’t for the Center for the Book and the programs they have established and partnered with to help promote literacy growth throughout the nation and overseas. This month for Library Lovers’ Month, let’s show some love for the administrations that helped shape our beloved libraries!

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