UNG The Gold I See: The Legacy of UNG’s Dahlonega Campus – Cover Reveal

The University of North Georgia Press is pleased to announce the release of our first children’s book: UNG The Gold I See: The Legacy of UNG’s Dahlonega Campus by Dr. Bonita Jacobs, out November 27, 2018. We’re excited to reveal its stunning cover by illustrator J’Nelle Short.

The front cover of UNG The Gold I See by Dr. Bonita Jacobs, illustrated by J'Nelle Short. A red-headed boy holds a treasure map. Price Memorial and it's gold steeple stand behind him. A nighthawk, the UNG mascot, guides his way.
Illustrated by J’Nelle Short

Benjamin Brown, his daughter Jamie, and grandson Tommy each have a different goal during UNG Dahlonega’s Visitor’s Day. The grandfather wants to recall the memories of his years in the Corps of Cadets. The mother wants to remember her years in the Nursing program. And the grandson wants to find UNG Dahlonega’s treasure: the gold hidden somewhere on campus. He has Nigel and a treasure map; his grandfather and mother have the memories. What do you have?

Illustrator J’Nelle Short grew up in East Texas and attended Stephen F. Austin University where she earned her BFA. Upon graduating, she worked as a graphic artist for six years before finding her calling in education. She has been cultivating the creativity of her students for 33 years through her art classes and has been named “Teacher of the Year” six times. Short is a vibrant force in her community, serving as coordinator of the annual Veterans Day Celebration, Operation Fly-a-Flag, and Garden Club. Her art passions are many but include watercolor, graphic design, and large-scale murals. She loves life and enjoys decorating, traveling, and scuba diving.

Read more about UNG The Gold I See:

New Release: UNG The Gold I See: The Legacy of UNG’s Dahlonega Campus (Children’s Book)

The University of North Georgia Press is pleased to announce the release of our first children’s book entitled UNG The Gold I See: The Legacy of UNG’s Dahlonega Campus written by Dr. Bonita Jacobs and out November 27, 2018.

While written for readers at Level 4, UNG The Gold I See engages readers of all ages, reflecting its multi-generational main characters. Benjamin Brown, his daughter Jamie, and grandson Tommy each have a different goal during Visitor’s Day at UNG Dahlonega’s Campus. The grandfather wants to recall the memories of his years in the Corps of Cadets. The mother wants to remember her years in the nursing program. And the grandson wants to find UNG Dahlonega’s treasure: the gold hidden somewhere on campus. He has Nigel and a treasure map; his grandfather and mother have the memories. What do you have?

The author, Dr. Jacobs, is president of the University of North Georgia. Among her many initiatives at UNG, Dr. Jacobs’ scholarship support for students has been a major priority. All profits from UNG The Gold I See will be used to provide scholarships to UNG students across all five campuses. This is the first book in a series about each UNG campus. UNG Gainesville will be the second book in the series, out in 2019.

Dr. Jacobs took office as the 17th president of North Georgia College & State University in July 2011 as the University’s first woman president and only the second to lead one of the country’s six Senior Military Colleges. In 2014, Jacobs was named as one of the “100 Most Influential Georgians” by Georgia Trend magazine and as one of the “Top Education Leaders in Atlanta” by the Atlanta Business Chronicle in 2013 and 2014. The University of North Georgia Press, a scholarly, peer-reviewed press, is an extension of our sponsoring university, the University of North Georgia. Our primary function is to promote education and research with a special emphasis on innovative scholarship and pedagogy.

Shell Shock in “The Secret Battle”

We’re honored to have The Secret Battle editor Dr. Austin Riede as a guest author today. Dr. Riede is an English professor at the University of North Georgia.

What drew me most to The Secret Battle is its frank and curious exploration of the phenomenon of shell shock, the particular form of war trauma that developed during the first World War. While all wars generate trauma, shell shock has become a historical (if still inexact) term that signifies the individual trauma of soldiers and nurses in the war, as well as the larger cultural trauma of the war.

While The Secret Battle is not the first novel to explore the issue of shell shock, I think it is the first to do so from the point of view of a sympathetic, but somewhat detached, narrator. The unnamed narrator, like Herbert himself, has seen and experienced the war firsthand. The narrator who tells the story of Harry Penrose is clearly interested in his friend, but he is also confused about what has happened to him, and the question of why this happened to Harry and not to him—or to any other soldier who may have found himself in the same position.

Among the myriad characters in British literature suffering shell shock, Harry Penroses’s case is perhaps the most subtle and understated. In Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Septimus Smith suffers rather ostentatiously and schizophrenically. In her novel Return of the Soldier, Rebecca West’s Chris Baldry suffers from easily identifiable (and clearly allegorical) amnesia, like Ford Madox Ford’s Christopher Tietjens from his Parade’s End tetralogy,. Later depictions of shell shocked soldiers, the fictional Billy Prior and the fictionalized Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon in Pat Barker’s Man Booker prize winning Regeneration trilogy, are similarly overtly traumatized. All of these are excellent explorations of what shell shock meant for British literature and culture, and Harry Penrose deserves to take a place among them. His shell shock is less easy to identify. The symptoms are subtle and the situation is non-allegorical. Although Harry Penrose’s story is unique, what is so striking, both to the narrator and to the reader, is how easily it could have happened to anybody. Among the literary depictions of shell shock, Harry Penrose—no artistic or mathematical genius, no paragon of manhood—is the most typical and in many ways, the most tragically and unnecessarily doomed.

The Secret Battle releases May 28, 2018. While you wait, don’t miss out on our other exciting The Secret Battle events:

• Mar 21 — Cover Reveal
• Apr 4 — Press Release
• Apr 25— “Editing and Annotating The Secret Battle” by Ed. Austin Riede
• May 2 — Editor Interview
• May 2 — Giveaway Begins
• May 9 — Sample Chapter
• May 16 — “Shell Shock in The Secret Battle” by Ed. Austin Riede
• May 23 — Launch Info
• May 28 — Book Release

Editing and Annotating “The Secret Battle”

We’re honored to have The Secret Battle editor Dr. Austin Riede as a guest author today. Dr. Riede is an English professor at the University of North Georgia.

Working on The Secret Battle was the first time I edited an historical text. My approach to editing the text was to try and preserve the novel’s text in its original form, so I made up my mind to preserve the British spellings, and only try to change errors. I soon found that the text had gone through many small changes in subsequent editions since 1919, and in almost all cases, I chose the original spelling or phrase.

I approached the novel by keeping in mind that its potential audience is broad. When reading an annotated novel, I’ve always found it annoying when some name or reference which I am unfamiliar with is not explained in a note. This is most likely to occur when reading a novel or text on an unfamiliar topic from an unfamiliar period or region. While the World War I literature and history buff may be familiar with a broad range of geographical and cultural references in the text, I chose to annotate with the first-year university student—born in this millennium rather than the last—in mind.

That said, the novel challenged my own knowledge on the War. While it was easy to explain things like the location of the Dardanelles, or where in London the Haymarket is, I soon found that Herbert was treating his topic with the immediacy and familiarity of someone who had just lived through the war. He was writing to an audience for whom the geography and the battles of the war would have been intimately familiar from newspaper accounts, as well as from accounts of the hundreds of thousands of soldiers revolving in and out of the England on leave, or returned permanently due to injury. The painful details of the failed invasion of the Dardanelles would have been fresh in the minds of Herbert’s intended audience. They would have read accounts in the paper of soldiers staying on the Island of Mudros, and would have had a clearer picture of the cliffs of Cape Helles in the Dardanelles, or of Vimy Ridge in France. I tried to be as inclusive as possible in the notes, so as to give the 21st century reader a clear picture of where exactly the characters are and what they are experiencing.

Editing and annotating The Secret Battle was a wonderful experience, and hopefully my work will help bring the novel to a new generation of readers.

The Secret Battle releases May 28, 2018. While you wait, don’t miss out on our other exciting The Secret Battle events:

• Mar 21 — Cover Reveal
• Apr 4 — Press Release
• Apr 25— “Editing and Annotating The Secret Battle” by Ed. Austin Riede
• May 2 — Editor Interview
• May 2 — Giveaway Begins
• May 9 — Sample Chapter
• May 16 — “Shell Shock in The Secret Battle” by Ed. Austin Riede
• May 23 — Launch Info
• May 28 — Book Release

Gloria Bennett on “A Room of One’s Own”

We’re honored to have Gloria Bennett guest-author today’s A Room of One’s Own celebration. Bennett is a creative writing professor at UNG. Her work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in a number of literary journals and reviews.

I was introduced to Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own as an undergraduate, and her words continue to inspire me. For me, the spirit of the essay is the emphasis on women having a dedicated private workspace. We need a quiet place, a room of our own, in order to write, to create, to map out our goals, and to pursue our dreams. If we’re going to succeed, we have to figure out a way to free ourselves from day-to-day distractions and commitments on our time.

I have a dedicated room in my home that serves as an office, but I use that space to grade my students’ compositions, and to work on lesson plans and other duties. While necessary in my line of work, these activities keep me from pursuing my art and making progress towards my own creativity.

Last spring, tight deadlines required me to finish the first draft of a book-length memoir I had spent the previous four summers working on. I began looking into writers’ retreats, applied to a handful, and was awarded a brief writer’s residency at an educational center and artist retreat in northwest Georgia, located in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains.

For three days and two nights, I was the only guest on the premises. I stayed in one of several cottages, which was equipped with everything I needed for my stay: a fully furnished kitchen and bath, a comfortable bed, and a cozy writing space. I was surrounded by natural beauty, which inspired me to continue my writing project. When I needed a break from my work, I went for long walks through the woods on well-established trails, or sat in a rocking chair on the front porch to take in the mountain views. With the exception of the grounds keeper, who came to check on me at least twice a day, I was completely alone. The only other signs of life were the wildlife that ventured near my cottage.

As of this writing, I’m planning a similar trip for late May of this year—to the mountains of northern Alabama—for writing and reflection. Financial support systems like these are so important to writers, and other artists, who are seeking a room of their own to transform their craft into art, a thing of beauty for others to enjoy.

My Time with the Press

This last year that I’ve had with the University of North Georgia Press is proof that things happen for a reason. There is a plan for the universe, and if something doesn’t work out it only means that there is something better just around the corner. When I first applied to work with the Press, I was excited to have this opportunity, especially since my dream is to work in the book publishing industry. However, I was filled with disappointment from finding out that I did not get another job that I had interviewed for just a few weeks previous. This is truly the best thing that could have happened.

Working with the Press has validated my chosen career path and allowed me to gain some of the experience that is so necessary for me to break through the competition. I’ve been able to jump into the industry at the end of my collegiate experience and begin to fully understand what it means to be an editor.

Before, I knew that the job would involve combing through manuscripts, searching for mistakes and ways that the writing could improve. What I didn’t understand is the huge amount of writing, marketing, and graphic design that would be included in the process of releasing a book to the public. I didn’t know about those important elements before, but their presence is not disappointing.

I love watching a book evolve, knowing that I was there to see its transformation. I edited, I marketed, and I designed. I love shaping the book, molding it into a better version of itself. I love knowing that readers will enjoy it that much more because of the time and effort that I put in. I love helping the author reach an audience in the most effective way.

As I approach the end of my time with the University of North Georgia Press, I just want to say thank you. Thank you for taking the time to work with a student who had too many things on her plate. Thank you for showing me the ropes, and showing me that there is more to love about publishing than just perfecting the words on the page. And thank you for shaping my childlike passion for the written word into something mature and concrete.

My Mission with The Press

Kathryn Patterson '18
Kathryn Patterson ’18
Photo Credit: Erin Higidon, UNG Vanguard Editor

When I am posed with the question of what brought me to the University of North Georgia Press one word seems to do the trick; metamorphosis. There is something extraordinarily beautiful about the transformation of the written word, the knowledge that style and tone can impart, and the clarity that editing provides.

I feel that interning with the UNG Press will provide a unique medium where I can become more competent in shaping and guiding not only my works, but also the work of others. I hope that the Press’ drive will center on helping writers to focus on collective creativity and technique. Reshaping complex ideas will hopefully be a result of our ingenuity. My mission is to inspire our team while channeling my thoughts and ideas towards a refined piece. I look forward to shaping other’s understanding in order to break through to the music of each individual work.

My goal is to bring forth the artistry of coherence. I am determined to balance clarity and elegance through rhetorical expression, while making it my goal to thrive off the innovation and intricate strategies of form and function. This is my aim because other editors’ and authors’ precise writing styles have inspired me to follow my passion.

It is my hope that these inspirations that have brought me to The Press will carry me further through a career in writing and publication. My passion is the passion of others. What I mean is, I seek to dedicate my life’s work to truly listening and sharing the passions of others. I believe it is my calling to encourage others to share their creations. This is what encourages and enlightens my own work.

I write to teach and to learn, but most of all to inspire. I hope that my experience with The Press can provide others with insight into themselves and the brilliance of publications. I am determined to become proficient in providing a perceptive account of conviction and thought. I see this internship as an opportunity to not only further explore my passion of publication but to also find new ways to assist writers in their own journey through expression.

My hope is that we as UNG Press writers and editors will guide one another toward the very inspirations that give us our name.

This is why I’m an English major. This is why I’ve asked to intern with the Press. But most importantly, this is why I write.