“The War in the Air” Sample Chapter

In seven weeks, The War in the Air releases! H. G. Wells’s foreboding futuristic novel was first published in 1908. Much of his work discusses human nature in the face of warfare and includes many technological developments before they existed. This 100-year-anniversary reprint edition remembers a world before aircrafts ruled the skies. Edited by H. G. Wells scholar Aaron Worth, this reprint includes an introduction as well as additional reading recommendations.

Cover by Corey Parson

See for yourself. A free sample chapter is available now.

The War in the Air (978-1-940771-30-4) releases May 28, 2018, from the University of North Georgia Press. It can be purchased through Ingram, Amazon, and other major retailers for $24.95.

Don’t miss out on our other exciting The War in the Air events:

“The Secret Battle” Press Release

Jillian Murphy
706-864-1556
jillian.murphy@ung.edu
The Secret Battle
University of North Georgia Press, May 28, 2018

Dahlonega, GA—The University of North Georgia Press is pleased to release The Secret Battle by A. P. Herbert, edited by Dr. Austin Riede, out May 28, 2018.

Originally published in 1919, The Secret Battle honestly portrays the mental horrors World War I inflicted upon soldiers. Harry Penrose is an Oxford student who enlists in 1914. He’s hard working, modest, and dutiful but struggles to cope with the toll of war. During the Battle of Gallipoli, Penrose seeks refuge to avoid shellfire, but another office sees him and accuses Penrose of desertion. Court martialed and branded a coward, Penrose is betrayed by the very system for which he fought.

Though not autobiographical, Penrose and the narrator follow experiences of author A. P. Herbert, who fought in the Gallipoli Campaign. Penrose’s trial is likely based on that of Sub-Lieutenant Edwin Dyett, an officer who was court martialed and executed for desertion in 1916. Considered a literary masterpiece, The Secret Battle is an early example of war literature, showcasing the importance of a soldier’s mind as well as his body, and deserves “a permanent place in war literature” (Winston Churchill, from the 1988 Oxford University Press edition).

The Secret Battle (978-1-940771-38-0) releases May 28, 2018. It is a 6×9 paperback. Part of the UNG Press’ World War I series, it will make the perfect addition to any historian’s collection. It can be purchased through Ingram, Amazon, and other major retailers for $24.95.

“The War in the Air” Press Release

Jillian Murphy
706-864-1556
jillian.murphy@ung.edu
The War in the Air
University of North Georgia Press, May 28, 2018

Dahlonega, GA— Nothing ever changes in Bun Hill, the simple country town where Bert Smallways lived. It’s enough that motor-bicycles crowd the road and the South of England Aero Club hosts a weekly ascent. But when Mr. Alfred Butteridge successfully flies his heavier-than-air machine from the Crystal Palace to Glasgow and back, Bert’s known-world disappears.

By chance or fate, Bert is trapped in Butteridge’s hot air balloon, then kidnapped by a German air fleet. Led by Prince Karl Albert, the German fleet crosses the Atlantic Ocean to launch the world’s first aerial attack against America. Forced into their service, Bert encounters the horror of war first-hand as human civilization collapses around him.

H. G. Wells’s foreboding futuristic novel was published in 1908. Much of his work discusses human nature in the face of warfare and includes many technological developments before they existed. This 100-year-anniversary reprint edition remembers a world before aircrafts ruled the skies. Edited by H. G. Wells scholar Aaron Worth, this reprint includes an introduction as well as additional reading recommendations.

The War in the Air (978-1-940771-30-4) releases May 28, 2018, from the University of North Georgia Press. It is a 6×9 paperback and will make a wonderful addition to any World War I collection. It can be purchased through Ingram, Amazon, and other major retailers for $24.95.

“The War in the Air” Cover Reveal

Cover by Corey Parson

The War in the Air (UNG Press Reprint) releases May 28, 2018. We can’t wait, but until then, we’re excited to share its amazing cover!

Don’t miss out on our other exciting The War in the Air events:

  • Mar 2 — Announcement Blog
  • Mar 9 — Cover Reveal
  • Mar 16 — Press Release
  • Apr 6 — Sample Chapter
  • May 2 — Giveaway Opens
  • May 23 — Launch Info
  • May 28 — Book Release

New Release: “The War in the Air” Reprint

The University of North Georgia Press is releasing a reprint of The War in the Air by H. G. Wells, edited by Dr. Aaron Worth.

Nothing ever changes in Bun Hill, the simple country town where Bert Smallways lived. It’s enough that motor-bicycles crowd the road and the South of England Aero Club hosts a weekly ascent. But when Mr. Alfred Butteridge successfully flies his heavier-than-air machine from the Crystal Palace to Glasgow and back, Bert’s known-world disappears.

By chance or fate, Bert is trapped in Butteridge’s hot air balloon, then kidnapped by a German air fleet. Led by Prince Karl Albert, the German fleet crosses the Atlantic Ocean to launch the world’s first aerial attack against America. Forced into their service, Bert encounters the horror of war first-hand as human civilization collapses around him.

H. G. Wells’s foreboding futuristic novel was published in 1908. Much of his work discusses human nature in the face of warfare and includes many technological developments before they existed. This 100-year-anniversary reprint edition remembers a world before aircrafts ruled the skies. Edited by H. G. Wells scholar Aaron Worth, a Victorian scholar and associate professor at Boston University, this reprint includes an introduction as well as addition reading recommendations.

Don’t miss out on our other exciting The War in the Air events:

  • Mar 2 — Announcement Blog
  • Mar 9 — Cover Reveal
  • Mar 16 — Press Release
  • Apr 6 — Sample Chapter
  • May 2 — Giveaway Opens
  • May 23 — Launch Info
  • May 28 — Book Release

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month With Us!

Today is the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month! It’s a month long celebration of Hispanic and Latino culture which runs from September 15 to October 15 in the U.S. We’re excited to learn more about it, and we hope you join us!

What is Hispanic Heritage Month?

Hispanic Heritage Month started in 1968 by President Lyndon B. Johnson. Originally only a week long, it was to honor the contributions and sacrifices of Hispanic and Latino Americans in the U.S. President Ronald Regan expanded it to a month-long celebration in 1988. It begins on September 15th because five Latin American countries celebrate their independence today: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Mexico, Chile, and Belize also celebrate their independence during the month.

Why is Hispanic Heritage Month Important?

Hispanic Heritage Month gives people an opportunity to connect to their heritage that they may not have otherwise. Over 17% of the U.S. population is Hispanic or Latino, making Hispanic Americans the largest minority in the U.S., whether ethnically or racially. 9.4% of Georgians are Hispanic or Latino as of July 2016. The Latin American diaspora has separated many people from their homelands and identities. Hispanic Heritage Month allows them to reconnect with their communities and strengthen their cultural identity.

Ways to Participate

We believe that everyone has a right to their heritage and cultural identity. “Local is Global” after all. Each Hispanic Heritage Month, the University of North Georgia hosts a series of events for students and members of the local community. Dance performances, guest speakers, and a Day of the Dead presentation will all be occuring. These events are sponsored by the Latin American Student Organization (LASO) on the Dahlonega campus, the Latino Student Association (LSA) on the Gainesville campus, and the Spanish Club on the Oconee campus, as well as Multicultural Student Affairs (MSA), directed by Dr. Robert Robinson.

UNG Reads will also be reading Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya for Hispanic Heritage Month. Project director Dr. Tanya Bennett says that this novel was chosen because of “its relatability to north Georgians with a Hispanic heritage.” UNG Reads will host campus events through October, including visiting author Daina Chaviano on October 25. More information can be found here.

Learn More

Each Wednesday during Hispanic Heritage Month, the Press will have a blog post featuring different Hispanic authors and books, as well as any updated information about the UNG events. Below are our first three recommendations. If you want to discuss these books, or have any other recommendations or requests, leave a comment, tweet us @UnivPressNG, or follow us on Facebook!

1. The Barbarian Nurseries — Héctor Tobar

The Barbarian Nurseries follows the Torres-Thompson family—half Mexican only in name—and their live-in Mexican employee, Araceli Ramírez. When the Torres-Thompson parents disappear, leaving behind two boys who Araceli has never spoken to, she must find a way to bring them to their grandfather. Tobar’s tongue-in-cheek tone creates a compelling narrative. The duality of American and Mexican identity follows each character in this book about humanity and what it means to belong.

 

2. The House on Mango Street — Sandra Cisneros

A classic. Taught byevery English teach, read by children and adults alike. The House on Mango Street is a bittersweet memory shared to the world. Told in a series of vignettes, Cisneros wrote a novel that “can be opened at any page and… still make sense.” Mango Street creates the universal ache of growing up, the pain of conflicting identities and forlorn hope that each person experiences. But in its sorrows, it reminds us that we are not alone in the world. “You can’t erase what you know. You can’t forget who you are.” But you can still be free.

 

3. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao — Junot Díaz

The de León family is cursed. The fukú has followed them for generations, in the Dominican Republic, in America, lurking in every corner. The story rotates between characters, following Oscar, his sister Lola, and their mother Beli. This novel is heart-wrenching. A dreaded tale where something always gets worse. Your heart breaks for the de León’s, but the multigenerational tale creates the feelings of being part of something greater than everyday life. The novel makes you unsure of your footing from the start, but the chaos is authentic, and as you’ll learn, ever family has their own fukú.

Sources:
National Hispanic Heritage Month 2017 (Gov)
National Hispanic Heritage Month 2017
U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Georgia
Latino Student Association connects UNG students to Hispanic culture
UNG reads “Bless Me Ultima”

The 5 Books You Need for Fall

It might be hard to believe, but Fall is in the air—despite the 90 degree Georgia heat! Students are returning to classes, the days are growing shorter, and more than a few stores have Halloween decorations up. If you’re tired of the sun, if you’re ready to bundle up with a blanket and watch the leaves change, then you should take these 5 books with you on your Autumn journey.

1. The Graveyard Book — Neil Gaiman

Nobody Owens is as far from normal as his name implies. Given the Freedom of the Graveyard as a toddler, he was raised by the ghosts and spirits and other supernatural creatures that lived there. Gaiman’s tale weaves a world of supernatural magic, capturing readers and refusing to let them go. This dark but endearing tale is the perfect lead-in to Fall.

2. Persuasion — Jane Austen

Any Austin novel is an excellent choice, no matter the season, but Persuasion is particularly perfect. Autumn is such a tender symbol within it. Anne Elliot’s everlasting love for Captain Wentworth, and his ultimate commitment to her, renews one’s faith and joy in love. It is what twilit Autumn nights dream of.

3. The Diviners — Libba Bray

Do you love H. P. Lovecraft? Die whenever you read “The Fall of the House of Usher?” Shiver if a raven crosses your path? Then read The Diviners. Set in the bright and shiny 1920s, Libba Bray creates a world that any horror-fan will love. The rise of occultism under the peeling facade of glamor in New York City causes an unstoppable supernatural horror to be released, and there’s no guarantee to stopping it.

4. Maid Marian — Elsa Watson

The tale of Robin Hood has long lived in any reader’s heart, but it is Maid Marian who deserves a grand adventure this season. Watson’s retelling brings forth a vivd image: Marian is imaginative and clever and determined to live her own life. Under Queen Eleanor’s threat, Marian will marry her departed husband’s brother, but she knows she’ll likely disappear once she does. Marian seeks Robin Hood’s aid, yes, but she proves to everyone she is so much more than a girl needing help.

5. Dreamcatcher — Stephen King

Everyone knows King in some form. His works are legendary, and he is a true master of horror and suspense. If you haven’t read Dreamcatcher, do so immediately. But fair warning: you probably shouldn’t read it at night. Or at a cabin in the woods. Or during a blizzard. You never know what sinister creature might innocently ask for your help in the middle of the dark and lonely night.