My Mission with The Press

Kathryn Patterson '18
Kathryn Patterson ’18
Photo Credit: Erin Higidon, UNG Vanguard Editor

When I am posed with the question of what brought me to the University of North Georgia Press one word seems to do the trick; metamorphosis. There is something extraordinarily beautiful about the transformation of the written word, the knowledge that style and tone can impart, and the clarity that editing provides.

I feel that interning with the UNG Press will provide a unique medium where I can become more competent in shaping and guiding not only my works, but also the work of others. I hope that the Press’ drive will center on helping writers to focus on collective creativity and technique. Reshaping complex ideas will hopefully be a result of our ingenuity. My mission is to inspire our team while channeling my thoughts and ideas towards a refined piece. I look forward to shaping other’s understanding in order to break through to the music of each individual work.

My goal is to bring forth the artistry of coherence. I am determined to balance clarity and elegance through rhetorical expression, while making it my goal to thrive off the innovation and intricate strategies of form and function. This is my aim because other editors’ and authors’ precise writing styles have inspired me to follow my passion.

It is my hope that these inspirations that have brought me to The Press will carry me further through a career in writing and publication. My passion is the passion of others. What I mean is, I seek to dedicate my life’s work to truly listening and sharing the passions of others. I believe it is my calling to encourage others to share their creations. This is what encourages and enlightens my own work.

I write to teach and to learn, but most of all to inspire. I hope that my experience with The Press can provide others with insight into themselves and the brilliance of publications. I am determined to become proficient in providing a perceptive account of conviction and thought. I see this internship as an opportunity to not only further explore my passion of publication but to also find new ways to assist writers in their own journey through expression.

My hope is that we as UNG Press writers and editors will guide one another toward the very inspirations that give us our name.

This is why I’m an English major. This is why I’ve asked to intern with the Press. But most importantly, this is why I write.

 

The Creativity of the Crowd

The Crowdsourced Poetry Project is under way! We have three lines so far and are excited to see more contributions to our sestina. Go to our Facebook page to submit your contribution for the next line. Our poem so far:

I began to ask myself the questions
With answers hanging in the air
What is here is noise, above which we can hear

For those of you who don’t already know, the Press is doing an experiment in creativity where we are hoping to harness the wisdom and imagination of the public to create a stunning poem. We have chosen to use the sestina for our form, mostly because it requires no rhyming or syllable counting, making it more accessible to contributors, while its use of repeated end-words gives it just enough complexity and structure so that it won’t spin off into a wild dervish. A sestina is a poem of six stanzas that are each six lines long and then a final, three line envoi. The stanzas all end with the same six words as the first stanza, though in a very specific order. In “Sestina: Altaforte” Ezra Pound uses these words at the ends of the first six lines: peace, music, clash, opposing, crimson, and rejoicing. According to the form they reappear in the second stanza in a new order as: rejoicing, peace, crimson, music, opposing, and clash, and so on throughout the next four stanzas. The repetition of these words both allows and forces the writer to use them in new ways and with new meaning imbued each time, creating a rich tapestry of language where the pattern continues to reveal itself throughout. Please join us in our quest to crowdsource a poem; the results are sure to be interesting and possibly very beautiful indeed.

Committed as a Teaching Press: Print Ads and Press Releases

The University Press of North Georgia is proud to be a teaching press and is committed to providing NGCSU college students with real-life instructions and internship experience in a variety of different arenas of publishing.  One of the ways this is accomplished is through the “Intro to Publishing” class offered by the English Department and taught by Dr. Bonnie Robinson, UPNG Director.

This week the students are focusing on print ads and press releases. This section of the class is crucial in the students’ understanding of the publishing world and how they can effectively and appropriately approach the business and marketing portion of publishing.

Hannah Parson shares her thoughts on this experience:

This week we are covering print ads and press releases for new books. These are two very important aspects of creating a market for a new book. Print ads run in magazines, newspapers, and other periodicals.  The ads typically contain a picture of the Author, book jacket, quotes from critics praising the book, and the publisher, price, author, and book title. Press releases include interesting facts and excerpts from the book. This is sent out to journalists. These press releases are the means of getting your book reviewed and exposed to the public.

This work will be useful in our future work because of the experience in marketing that we will be using in a job with a publishing agency. This is the first exposure to the world of book marketing that we will need not only as employees in a publishing firm but also as a professional author attempting to market themselves and their work. Without this experience, we would lack the fundamental knowledge of the tools necessary for the successful launch and retail of any book we will ever work to publish.

Committed as a Teaching Press: Literary Agents and Proofreading

The University Press of North Georgia is proud to be a teaching press and is committed to providing NGCSU college students with real-life instructions and internship experience in a variety of different arenas of publishing.  One of the ways this is accomplished is through the “Intro to Publishing” class offered by the English Department and taught by Dr. Bonnie Robinson, UPNG Director.

Ben Helton, a student in Intro to Publishing , shares about what they are learning in class:

This week, Dr. Robinson will be addressing literary agents, as well as legal aspects of publishing… Dr. Robinson always conveys a genuine enthusiasm about the given points of discussion and her desire to provide options for the student in terms of a potential career path.

Although we have briefly discussed literary agents, I am looking forward on delving more deeply into the topic. Since I am interested in both creative writing and serving as a literary agent, this lecture willallow me to have a greater grasp of what it may be like to work with a literary agent, while
simultaneously gaining insight in regard to what working as a literary agent entails.

In preparation for this week’s in-class meeting, we were asked to finds mistakes online or in any publication as a proofreading assignment… These editing responsibilities were divided between two to three individuals, and serve as further practice to sharpen our skills as editors.

 

Committed as a Teaching Press: Copyediting and Digital Editing

The University Press of North Georgia is proud to be a teaching press and is committed to providing NGCSU college students with real-life instructions and internship experience in a variety of different arenas of publishing.  One of the ways this is accomplished is through the “Intro to Publishing” class offered by the English Department and taught by Dr. Bonnie Robinson, UPNG Director.

Continuing to learn about copyediting, the students have been focusing on learning proof reading symbols. Jason Dyer, our student of the week, stated that

Whether one is a writer or an editor, it is essential to understand the meaning of proof reading symbols and editorial jargon.

In order to properly understand the proofreading symbols, the students refer to The Chicago Manual of Style. The chart they have been using appears here.

The past few weeks, the students in “Intro to Publishing” have also been digging into different topics on their own and giving presentations on their findings, learning about teaching and researching in the process.  Jason Dyer explains what he has learned from this process:

Each week a student has delivered a ten-minute presentation on a given topic that relates to the course material.  Last week Cara Cunningham spoke about online copyediting.  She shared essential information on Microsoft track changes as the standard medium for digital editing.  She also spoke about the many types of companies that specialize in online copyediting. By pointing the way to these companies, Cara blazed the trail for any ambitious student with the desire to seek immediate employment.  The common thread of the presentations, each week a student opens a doorway into a different aspect of the publishing industry exposing students to a new set of opportunities.  This coming Tuesday we will discover the fascinating world of indexing with Rachel Alsup.

From the students I have spoken with on campus, they seem to really enjoy this class and the practical skills they learn from it.  Jason was no exception, declaring:

Personally, I appreciate the dynamics of this class.  Seamless integration of student participation, online learning, and open communication within the boundaries of a solid framework built by Dr. Robinson reflect the essence of a true teaching press.

Committed as a Teaching Press: Applying Grammar Skills to Real Life

The University Press of North Georgia is proud to be a teaching press and is committed to providing NGCSU college students with real-life instructions and internship experience in a variety of different arenas of publishing.  One of the ways this is accomplished is through the “Intro to Publishing” class offered by the English Department and taught by Dr. Bonnie Robinson, UPNG Director.

This week, the students continue to learn about copyediting, sharing the following observations and learning outcomes, especially focusing on the importance and practicality of grammar skills.

Kristian Burks:

An editor must be willing and able to adapt according to each individual project throughout their career. Their job doesn’t stop at correcting grammatical errors; they must revise confusing passages while maintaining the author’s original tone. Editors must make the hard decisions concerning what aspects of the plot works and what the author will need to change in order to offer the reader the best experience possible.

Taylor Wade:

Our class has recently been given copyediting assignments. These assignments allow us to experience one aspect of an editor’s role in the publication process. Last week, we looked at editorial reports. This week, we build on the process by continuing our work with an author. After reading over the manuscript, receiving the reader’s report, and initially contacting the author, the editor must now work through the actual editing process of the manuscript.

Editing consists of two parts simultaneously working together. An editor must first know and properly perform editing marks. What good is having a knowledge of what the sentence should look and sound like if the editor can’t express the needed corrections to the author? This stage of editing causes editors to play by the book, so to speak. If a comma needs to be inserted or taken out, the editor must know the proper copyediting technique to inform the author what needs correcting.

The other part of editing involves a sense of grammatical knowledge and feel that sometimes cannot be taught. An editor must ensure a manuscript flows within a story. Sometimes this change involves a simple addition or subtraction of a comma; sometimes this change involves switching a sentence from active to passive voice, and vice versa; other times, this change involves moving entire paragraphs to different parts of the story for the sake of fluidity and comprehension. This only comes in time with more experience in the field and, while we can get it, in the classroom.

Do you have an editor that you appreciate? How have your grammar skills helped you in your field?

Committed as a Teaching Press: Copyediting

The University Press of North Georgia is proud to be a teaching press and is committed to providing NGCSU college students with real-life instructions and internship experience in a variety of different arenas of publishing.  One of the ways this is accomplished is through the “Intro to Publishing” class offered by the English Department and taught by Dr. Bonnie Robinson, UPNG Director.

The students will cover three different types of editing: developmental editing, copyediting, and and proofreading. This week, the students are focusing on copyediting. Copyediting involves things such as: editing for grammar, spelling, punctuation, and other mechanics of style; creating a style sheet to follow for matters of hyphenation, font, capitalization, and spelling that may differ according to region; checking for internal consistency in regard to facts;  and checking  or altering the system of citations.  This process is tedious, as the students in “Intro to Publishing” are discovering this week. About the exercise, Sofia Bork writes:

Our class is required to turn in two copyediting exercises for a grade. The process of copyediting is essential to the publishing market as a whole, because mistakes in any field, especially that of the publishing world can be costly. Copyeditors have a serious job in the publishing field, because they see a plethora of manuscripts on a daily basis.

The way I will use my copyediting skills is obvious in the publishing field, because I want to eventually work as an editor for a large publishing company. To achieve this goal, I will have to start on an entry-level position as a copyeditor or a proofreader. It is important for me to learn how to copyedit perfectly, so that I can stand out to my employers and move up the corporate ladder. Also, if an editor sees that a copyeditor is particularly thorough with their work, then their work is highly valued and their opinions on a manuscript garner more weight.

What skills are required to make you stand out in your field? How do they compare to copyediting?