“New Army Officer’s Survival Guide” Giveaway [CLOSED]

New Army Officer’s Survival Guide releases February 12, 2018. We’re giving you a chance to win a free copy! There are four chances to win, including leaving a comment on this post, so don’t miss any.

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If You Like “New Army Officer’s Survival Guide,” You’ll Love These!

Starting today, we’re in training. New Army Officer’s Survival Guide comes out February 12! It’s only 4 short weeks, but we can’t wait. These three military titles are our lifeline until then.

Over the Top by Arthur Guy Empey

Arthur Guy Empey served as an American in the British Army in the early days of World War I. After fighting in the trenches, Empey began writing short stories of his overseas military experience. Wounded in the line of duty and discharged soon after, Empey returned to America and compiled his stories into one volume entitled Over the Top. Published in 1917 only weeks after the United States declared war on Germany and the Central Powers, Over the Top quickly became a bestseller, bringing fame and notoriety to the previously unknown author. An estimated one million copies were printed from May 1917 through November 1918. To date, Empey’s American point of view of fighting as a British soldier makes Over the Top the most readable and engaging introduction to the experience of trench fighting in print.

Turn Back Before Baghdad by Laurence Jolidon

In the early morning hours of January 12, 1991, telephones rang in the rooms of a dozen or so newspaper and wire service reporters at the Dhahran International, the Meridian, and other hotels in Eastern Saudi Arabia. War with the regime of Saddam Hussein over the oil province of Kuwait had become inevitable. The calls, telling the reporters to grab their gear and meet military public affairs officers in hotel lobbies, triggered the first media pools dispatched to cover Operation Desert Storm.

Jolidon’s work captures an important moment that will be studied by historians who examine the role of the media in wartime, and relations between the military and civilian reporters. Whatever history’s final judgment on the utility of the pool system, it is undeniable that the relationship between the Pentagon and the press has not been the same since.

Fighting Talk: Forty Maxims on War, Peace, and Strategy by Colin Gray

Colin Gray presents an inventive treatise on the nature of strategy, war, and peace, organized around forty maxims. This collection of mini essays will forearm politicians, soldiers, and the attentive general public against many—probably most— fallacies that abound in contemporary debates about war, peace, and security. While one can never guarantee strategic success, a strategic education led by the judgments in these maxims increases the chances that one’s errors will be small rather than catastrophic.

The maxims are grouped according to five clusters. “War and Peace” tackles the larger issues of strategic history that drive the demand for the services of strategic thought and practice. “Strategy” presses further, into the realm of strategic behavior, and serves as a bridge between the political focus of part one and the military concerns that follow. “Military Power and Warfare” turns to the pragmatic business of military performance: operations, tactics, and logistics. Part four, “Security and Insecurity,” examines why strategy is important, including a discussion of the nature, dynamic character, and functioning of world politics. Finally, “History and the Future” is meant to help strategists better understand the processes of historical change.

What are you pre-reading for the release of New Army Officer’s Survival Guide? Leave a comment below or visit us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to share. And don’t miss out on our other exciting New Army Officer’s Survival Guide events:

“New Army Officer’s Survival Guide” Sample Chapter

In six weeks, New Army Officer’s Survival Guide releases! This book provides everything a new officer needs to know, before they need to know it. It is the personal experience of  senior Army officer CPT Levi Floeter. CPT Floeter’s goal is to provide help and advice. In his own words, “we are always personally responsible for growing ourselves. If you are satisfied with your measure of accomplishment, you have just lost the most important battle in the war for self-development.”

See for yourself. A free sample chapter is available now.

New Army Officer’s Survival Guide: Cadet to Commission through Command (978-1-940771-40-3) releases February 12, 2018 from the University of North Georgia Press. It can be purchased from the University of North Georgia Press at www.ung.edu/university-press/ or Amazon and other major retailers for $24.99.

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“New Army Officer’s Survival Guide” Press Release

Jillian Murphy
706-864-1556
jillian.murphy@ung.edu
New Army Officer’s Survival Guide: Cadet to Commission through Command
University of North Georgia Press, February 12, 2018

Dahlonega, GA—Introducing the advice-equivalent of a double espresso for junior Army officers. The New Army Officer’s Survival Guide: Cadet to Commission through Command provides everything a new officer needs to know, before they need to know it. Active military have access to plenty of veteran life guides, but their search for current officer guidelines falls short. New Army Officer’s Survival Guide rescues them.

Author Levi Floeter spent 10 years learning how to be an officer. He’s been a Platoon Leader, Company Commander, Company X.O., and a Military Science professor. This book is the culmination of his hard work. The exact survival guide he wished he had, instead of the unanswered questions he was left with.

It is an inclusive military officer guide. The advice given is applicable for ROTC cadets to Captains to every promotion in between. The survival guide is divided into three sections: The Cadet, The Lieutenant, and The Captain. CPT Floeter shares his experiences about NCOERs, counseling, planning unit training, and more. He knows the Army successfully tells officers the “what” of their job, but “too often, the officer corps doesn’t have a lot written down in the “how” category.”

The New Army Officer’s Survival Guide is the personal experience of a senior Army officer. A biography as much as a guide. CPT Floeter’s goal is to provide help and advice. In his own words, “we are always personally responsible for growing ourselves. If you are satisfied with your measure of accomplishment, you have just lost the most important battle in the war for self-development.” He’s amicable, honestly sharing his worst experiences as well as his best. The advice comes from a proven leader that any junior officer can trust.

The New Army Officer’s Survival Guide: Cadet to Commission through Command (978-1-940771-40-3) releases February 12, 2018 from the University of North Georgia Press. It is a 5×7 nonfiction paperback: the perfect size to carry about and throw in your bag as a reference. It can be purchased from the University of North Georgia Press at www.ung.edu/university-press/, Amazon, and other major retailers for 24.99.

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“New Army Officer’s Survival Guide” Cover Reveal!

Cover design by Corey Parson

The New Army Officer’s Survival Guide: Cadet to Commission through Command releases in only 2 short months! We can’t wait to share the wealth of information author Levi Floeter provides, but for now, check out this amazing cover.

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About the “New Army Officer’s Survival Guide”: An Interview with Captain Levi Floeter

Coming out in 2018 is Levi Floeter’s The New Army Officer’s Survival Guide: Cadet to Commission through Command. The following is a brief Q & A about Captain Floeter and his book.

Did you always want to be an Officer in the Army?

Actually, I did not. Originally, I wanted to be an Air Force Pararescueman so bad my eyeteeth hurt when I was growing up. I was initially disqualified for enlistment out of high-school for a surgery I’d had to my left shoulder, and it really threw me because I’d had no other plans. College wasn’t even on my radar as a young man, much less Commission as an Officer… It’s a funny world!

So if you didn’t always want to be an Officer in the Army, why did you decide to write this book?

In my first Command up in Alaska, I stumbled on an early manuscript of LTC Dave Dunphy’s book, “The Iron Major Survival Guide,” on our unit shared drive. This was right around the time I was getting really frustrated with being a Company Commander. It seemed then that I couldn’t do anything right, and yet, I had been to the Career Course and Ranger School and had met all the gates the Army said I needed to be successful. I was supposed to be an “expert” at my job. It had me all confused, feeling lost like that. I knew tactics and doctrine, but I didn’t know ANYTHING about the other stuff Commanders are expected to know—legal matters or counseling or NCOERs or planning unit training when faced with a Brigades’ long range calendar. I was even wondering whether the Army was right for me.

Reading that manuscript was a pivotal moment for me because, while it was only about 36 pages or so at that time, that little book was jammed full of advice to help struggling Majors—and as I read it, it opened my eyes to a reality. I was looking at the work of a Lieutenant Colonel who was trying to make it easier on Majors coming up, and here he was explaining things to them that I always thought everybody but me somehow simply must have learned somewhere I hadn’t been yet. It stunned me, and I was suddenly fully aware that others had been or were currently also in my shoes, and that at every level we are all just trying to “figure it out.” The Army does a fantastic job of telling officers the WHAT of their job, but too often as a whole, the Officer Corps doesn’t have a lot written down in the HOW category. I felt that if a Lieutenant Colonel saw the need to develop Field Grade Officers, why shouldn’t I should try to put something out there for those guys younger than me, and make it easier on them?

If your book is intended to aid the success of young officers, in your opinion, which are the most important characteristics of Officers that you have seen be successful?

The Officers I look up to definitely have some things in common. Based on them, I’d have to say that Trustworthiness, Temperance, Decisiveness, and Humility are all traits they share. I don’t think any Officer can go wrong trying to hold on to those values. Or for that matter, anybody.

What is the best way to prepare for a career as an Officer?

Read a lot, ask good questions, and take an interest in your program. Oh, and stay in shape!

Speaking of staying in shape, in the past few years physical standards for women in the military has been debated a good bit—why is Gender Integration as it affects future Officers or the Army not addressed in this work?

Gender integration is a hot-button issue across the Military these days, and the techniques described in here aren’t based on an Officer’s sex. I didn’t feel gender had any place in the work; the advice here ought to be as good for a female finance officer as it would for a male Engineer, or anyone else.

I had the fortune to serve my second Company Command in the Airborne and Ranger Training Brigade when the first female Ranger students came through the course, and my views on gender integration and culture are two-fold.

It is my opinion that A) if a woman can serve in the Combat Arms successfully, she should be allowed to give it her best shot, and B) no one, regardless of their sex, should be given a free pass into the Combat Arms for any reason, because that could result in putting lives at risk in combat. As for the cultural implications? Those remain to be seen. I don’t feel I’m an expert on predicting cultural changes. 

Understandable. In the book, there is also an omission of other commissioning sources such as Green to Gold, or Officer’s Candidate School. Why is that not addressed?

Typically, Green to Gold has an audience that already knows a good deal about the Army, because they have at least four years enlisted time, and OCS really is it’s own beast. However, neither program is intentionally excluded from this book, and the advice in sections two and three would still help the new OCS or Green to Gold Commissionee the same as any other new LT or CO.

Since there are parallels for what may be seen as challenging or difficult for a new officer, what was the hardest thing about being a new Army officer?

The hardest thing for me as a newly commissioned LT was trying to figure out exactly what my job was, and how to do it well. I had a lot of energy and drive, but I didn’t necessarily know where to put it, and when you are working alongside a bunch of Staff-Sergeants and Sergeant’s First-Class who already have everything figured out, it can get really easy to be in the way rather than be value added to an organization. I didn’t want that, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen, and nobody likes thinking they are doing the right thing only to find out afterward that they just got in somebody else’s lane and made a mess.

Obviously your early years went a complete mess, and you must have had some highlights and moments of enjoyment. What did you enjoy most in your first few years in the Army?

I really enjoyed being a Company Executive Officer. It was after my time as a Platoon leader, I had been made the Battalion Assistant S-4 for about six months (that’s like a logistical officer), and then I got to be the Executive Officer of the same Company I had been a deployed PL in. I knew everybody, we had some good memories together from down-range, and I got to help a new CO and a group of new PLs come into the unit and prepare for their deployment from first-hand experience with that Company. It was the golden moment of my Lieutenant time.

Will there be other books in this same vein?

My wife and I started to write one together aimed at helping New Army Spouses, both from the perspective of the Soldier and the perspective of the spouse, so, hopefully yes.

We look forward to publishing the New Army Officer’s Survival Guide: Cadet to Commission through Command, out February 12, and we hope you’ll be on the lookout for this great book! Don’t miss out on our other exciting New Army Officer’s Survival Guide events:

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New Release: “New Army Officer Survival Guide” by CPT Levi Floeter

We are incredibly excited to share our new release with you! The New Army Officer’s Survival Guide: Cadet to Commission through Command is the advice-equivalent to a double espresso for junior Army officers. It’s simple, it doesn’t take long to get through, and it provides results. Author Levi Floeter’s crisp and clear writing style answers many of the questions and concerns that cadets and junior officers have as they enter a career in the U.S. Army, making this book a great complement current to Army doctrine and regulations.

CPT Levi J. Floeter

Combining dozens of resources into a single and easily readable volume a cadet or junior officer can carry with them, the New Army Officer’s Survival Guide: Cadet to Commission through Command aids junior officers’ success by blending in Floeter’s first-hand experiences from over forty-one months in two separate Company Commands to personally advise and cover many lessons that most officers learn the hard way.

The book’s structure provides an overview of Army ROTC, a detailed walkthrough of skills needed by Junior Officers across the Army, and some explanations of techniques and possible leadership styles or methods to utilize in common situations. Four Annexes: Useful gear for the field and office; officer branch and Basic Officer Leader Course information; common acronyms and phrases, and a list of each Punitive Article of the UCMJ wrap up the book for quick access and reference.

Levi J. Floeter, following in his father’s footsteps (RET Air Force) into a military career, commissioned as an Army Infantry Officer from Eastern Washington University in 2008. Almost immediately after graduating Airborne and Infantry School at Fort Benning, Floeter received orders to deploy as a Platoon Leader in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from October 2009 – July 2010. Since then, Floeter has held various positions as a Company X.O., Battalion Operations Assistant, Company Commander (on two occasions), and most recently serves as an ROTC instructor in the Military Science Program at the University of Washington. CPT Floeter is married and is the father to one daughter.

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