Editing and Annotating “The Secret Battle”

We’re honored to have The Secret Battle editor Dr. Austin Riede as a guest author today. Dr. Riede is an English professor at the University of North Georgia.

Working on The Secret Battle was the first time I edited an historical text. My approach to editing the text was to try and preserve the novel’s text in its original form, so I made up my mind to preserve the British spellings, and only try to change errors. I soon found that the text had gone through many small changes in subsequent editions since 1919, and in almost all cases, I chose the original spelling or phrase.

I approached the novel by keeping in mind that its potential audience is broad. When reading an annotated novel, I’ve always found it annoying when some name or reference which I am unfamiliar with is not explained in a note. This is most likely to occur when reading a novel or text on an unfamiliar topic from an unfamiliar period or region. While the World War I literature and history buff may be familiar with a broad range of geographical and cultural references in the text, I chose to annotate with the first-year university student—born in this millennium rather than the last—in mind.

That said, the novel challenged my own knowledge on the War. While it was easy to explain things like the location of the Dardanelles, or where in London the Haymarket is, I soon found that Herbert was treating his topic with the immediacy and familiarity of someone who had just lived through the war. He was writing to an audience for whom the geography and the battles of the war would have been intimately familiar from newspaper accounts, as well as from accounts of the hundreds of thousands of soldiers revolving in and out of the England on leave, or returned permanently due to injury. The painful details of the failed invasion of the Dardanelles would have been fresh in the minds of Herbert’s intended audience. They would have read accounts in the paper of soldiers staying on the Island of Mudros, and would have had a clearer picture of the cliffs of Cape Helles in the Dardanelles, or of Vimy Ridge in France. I tried to be as inclusive as possible in the notes, so as to give the 21st century reader a clear picture of where exactly the characters are and what they are experiencing.

Editing and annotating The Secret Battle was a wonderful experience, and hopefully my work will help bring the novel to a new generation of readers.

The Secret Battle releases May 28, 2018. While you wait, don’t miss out on our other exciting The Secret Battle events:

• Mar 21 — Cover Reveal
• Apr 4 — Press Release
• Apr 25— “Editing and Annotating The Secret Battle” by Ed. Austin Riede
• May 2 — Editor Interview
• May 2 — Giveaway Begins
• May 9 — Sample Chapter
• May 16 — “Shell Shock in The Secret Battle” by Ed. Austin Riede
• May 23 — Launch Info
• May 28 — Book Release

Launch Info: “British Literature I” and “Accounting I”

In one short week, Accounting I and British Literature I: From the Middle Ages to Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century release!

Both books are an Open Educational Resource (OER), developed in partnership with Affordable Learning Georgia. As an OER, they are completely open access. It can be reused, remixed, and reedited freely without seeking permission. See below for more details on each book.

Cover by Corey Parson

British Literature I

Featuring over 50 authors and full texts of their works, this anthology follows the shift of monarchic to parliamentarian rule in Britain, and the heroic epic to the more egalitarian novel as genre. Edited by Laura Getty, Ph.D., and BJ Robinson, Ph.D., the anthology offers historical, cultural, social, and aesthetic framing, paired with original Author Introductions, Reading and Review Questions, and Key Terms. A forthcoming ancillary will be supported by open-enabled pedagogy, allowing readers to contribute to the project.

British Literature I: From the Middle Ages to Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century (978-1-940771-28-1) releases April 30, 2018. Print copies can be bought through Ingram, Amazon, and other major retailers for $49.99. Free digital copies can be downloaded from the University of North Georgia Press homepage at www.ung.edu/university-press.

Cover by Corey Parson

Accounting I

Well-written and straightforward, Accounting I is an asset to the business education world. Written in order to directly meet the needs of her students, this textbook developed from Dr. Christine Jonick’s years of teaching and commitment to effective pedagogy. It has over 100 charts and graphs, instructional exercises appearing both in-text and for Excel, and resources for student professional development. Peer reviewed by academic professionals and tested by students, this textbook is a needed contribution to open-sourced pedagogy.

Accounting I (978-1-940771-15-1) releases April 30, 2018. Print copies can be bought through Ingram, Amazon, and other major retailers for $29.99. Free digital copies can be downloaded from the University of North Georgia Press homepage at www.ung.edu/university-press.

Giveaway: “British Literature I” and “Accounting I” [Closed]

The University of North Georgia Press has two Open Education Resources releasing April 30: British Literature I: From the Middle Ages to Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century and Accounting I. We’re giving you a chance to win a free copy!

Click here to visit the British Literature I Rafflecopter giveaway.

Click here to visit the Accounting I Rafflecopter giveaway.

Leave a comment below or visit us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram to share. And don’t miss out on our other exciting events:

British Literature I

 

Accounting I

Accounting I Press Release

Jillian Murphy
706-864-1556
jillian.murphy@ung.edu
Accounting I
University of North Georgia Press, April 30, 2018

Dahlonega, GA—The University of North Georgia Press is pleased to announce the release of our latest Open Education Resource: Accounting I by Christine Jonick, PhD., out April 30, 2018.

Well-written and straightforward, Accounting I is an asset to the business education world. Written in order to directly meet the needs of her students, this textbook developed from Dr. Jonick’s years of teaching and commitment to effective pedagogy. It has over 100 charts and graphs, instructional exercises appearing both in-text and for Excel, and resources for student professional development. Peer reviewed by academic professionals and tested by students, this textbook is a needed contribution to open-sourced pedagogy.

As the University Press Partner for Affordable Learning Georgia, UNG Press is publishing this textbook as one of six Open Education Resources releasing this year. As an Open Education Resource, this text is completely open access. It can be reused, remixed, and reedited freely without seeking permission.

Accounting I (978-1-940771-15-1) releases April 30, 2018. Print copies can be bought through Ingram, Amazon, and other major retailers for $29.99. Free digital copies can be downloaded from the University of North Georgia Press homepage at www.ung.edu/university-press.

Writing Ekphrasis Poetry

Do you ever see a painting or photograph that speaks to you? An entire story that unfolds in your mind and begs you to write it?

Odds are you haven’t heard of ekphrasis poetry—not the technical name, anyway. Most of us don’t even know what the word ekphrasis means, but it’s likely you’ve read or written some ekphrastic poems in your life. Ekphrasis poetry is the vivid description of a scene or work of art. It’s not only description though. You often amplify and interpret the meaning of the artwork so much that a brand new world is created for the subject.

Photo by Alvaro Serrano on Unsplash

John Keats did it with “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” in which he created a life of dancing and music for a couple frozen in time on an urn. W.H. Auden’s “The Shield of Achilles” is ekphrastic as well. He reimagined the events of Homer’s description of the shield in The Iliad.  Countless others feel an overwhelming sense of inspiration to speak for and through works of art.

Writing an ekphrastic poem can be an easy start. Sometimes, it’s as simple as feeling inspired from any piece of art and putting pen to paper (or fingertips to keyboard). If you want to write your own ekphrastic poems, here are some prompts to help inspire you:

  1. Visit an art gallery or museum. Check out different exhibits and write about a specific work that catches your attention.
  2. Do you follow your favorite artist on social media? Write a poem inspired by one of their Instagram photos.
  3. Imagine van Gogh, Picasso, Dali, Kahlo—anyone!—have “lost works.” Write a poem about what you think their unseen paintings would look like. There could be a story there!
  4. Pick a painting or photograph special to you and write different poems about it. Create a different scenario each time—the possibilities are endless.

Ekphrasis poetry is all about being inspired by other forms of art. Writing ekphrastic poems can help us elicit inspiration, overcome writer’s block, and simply have fun while writing. We don’t all have to write an ode to an urn like Keats did, but we should have just as much fun challenging our writing and creative processes. So, go on! Find a picture on Instagram and write about it. Write about a very Starry Night. Just write!

British Literature I Press Release

Jillian Murphy
706-864-1556
jillian.murphy@ung.edu
British Literature I Anthology: From the Middle Ages to Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century
University of North Georgia Press, April 30, 2018

Dahlonega, GA—The University of North Georgia Press is pleased to announce the release of our latest Open Education Resource: British Literature I: From the Middle Ages to Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century, out April 30, 2018.

Featuring over 50 authors and full texts of their works, this anthology follows the shift of monarchic to parliamentarian rule in Britain, and the heroic epic to the more egalitarian novel as genre. Edited by Laura Getty, Ph.D., and BJ Robinson, Ph.D., the anthology offers historical, cultural, social, and aesthetic framing, paired with original Author Introductions, Reading and Review Questions, and Key Terms. A forthcoming ancillary will be supported by open-enabled pedagogy, allowing readers to contribute to the project.

As the University Press Partner for Affordable Learning Georgia, UNG Press is publishing this anthology as one of six Open Education Resources releasing this year. As an Open Education Resource, this text is completely open access. It can be reused, remixed, and reedited freely without seeking permission.

British Literature I: From the Middle Ages to Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century (978-1-940771-28-1) releases April 30, 2018. Print copies can be bought through Ingram, Amazon, and other major retailers for $49.99. Free digital copies can be downloaded from the University of North Georgia Press homepage at www.ung.edu/university-press.

“The War in the Air” Sample Chapter

In seven weeks, The War in the Air releases! H. G. Wells’s foreboding futuristic novel was first published in 1908. Much of his work discusses human nature in the face of warfare and includes many technological developments before they existed. This 100-year-anniversary reprint edition remembers a world before aircrafts ruled the skies. Edited by H. G. Wells scholar Aaron Worth, this reprint includes an introduction as well as additional reading recommendations.

Cover by Corey Parson

See for yourself. A free sample chapter is available now.

The War in the Air (978-1-940771-30-4) releases May 28, 2018, from the University of North Georgia Press. It can be purchased through Ingram, Amazon, and other major retailers for $24.95.

Don’t miss out on our other exciting The War in the Air events: