The 5 Books You Need for Fall

It might be hard to believe, but Fall is in the air—despite the 90 degree Georgia heat! Students are returning to classes, the days are growing shorter, and more than a few stores have Halloween decorations up. If you’re tired of the sun, if you’re ready to bundle up with a blanket and watch the leaves change, then you should take these 5 books with you on your Autumn journey.

1. The Graveyard Book — Neil Gaiman

Nobody Owens is as far from normal as his name implies. Given the Freedom of the Graveyard as a toddler, he was raised by the ghosts and spirits and other supernatural creatures that lived there. Gaiman’s tale weaves a world of supernatural magic, capturing readers and refusing to let them go. This dark but endearing tale is the perfect lead-in to Fall.

2. Persuasion — Jane Austen

Any Austin novel is an excellent choice, no matter the season, but Persuasion is particularly perfect. Autumn is such a tender symbol within it. Anne Elliot’s everlasting love for Captain Wentworth, and his ultimate commitment to her, renews one’s faith and joy in love. It is what twilit Autumn nights dream of.

3. The Diviners — Libba Bray

Do you love H. P. Lovecraft? Die whenever you read “The Fall of the House of Usher?” Shiver if a raven crosses your path? Then read The Diviners. Set in the bright and shiny 1920s, Libba Bray creates a world that any horror-fan will love. The rise of occultism under the peeling facade of glamor in New York City causes an unstoppable supernatural horror to be released, and there’s no guarantee to stopping it.

4. Maid Marian — Elsa Watson

The tale of Robin Hood has long lived in any reader’s heart, but it is Maid Marian who deserves a grand adventure this season. Watson’s retelling brings forth a vivd image: Marian is imaginative and clever and determined to live her own life. Under Queen Eleanor’s threat, Marian will marry her departed husband’s brother, but she knows she’ll likely disappear once she does. Marian seeks Robin Hood’s aid, yes, but she proves to everyone she is so much more than a girl needing help.

5. Dreamcatcher — Stephen King

Everyone knows King in some form. His works are legendary, and he is a true master of horror and suspense. If you haven’t read Dreamcatcher, do so immediately. But fair warning: you probably shouldn’t read it at night. Or at a cabin in the woods. Or during a blizzard. You never know what sinister creature might innocently ask for your help in the middle of the dark and lonely night.

National Book Lovers Day Spotlight: The Southern Philosopher: Collected Essays of John William Corrington

Today is National Book Lovers Day, the most exciting day at the University Press of North Georgia! To celebrate, we would like to spotlight our newest release: The Southern Philosopher: Collected Essays of John William Corrington, edited by Allen Mendenhall. … Continue reading