UNG: Rooted in tradition and leadership development

Bonita Jacobs
Bonita C. Jacobs, Ph.D., President

What defines UNG? The UNG community continues to work toward fulfillment of our Strategic Plan for 2014-2019, and one of our goals is focused on building institutional unity and campus identity. By their very nature, universities are changing, living entities, and the university remembered by alumni from 1960 is different than the one remembered by the 1985 alumni or the 2010 alumni.

Honoring the common experiences our students and alumni share — special places, special moments in history, special traditions — reinforce our connectedness and the unique characteristics of each of our campus communities. Toward that end, I have asked a group of faculty and staff, working with students and alumni, to document the traditions and activities that contribute to each campus’ culture, educational environment and student experience. We will preserve well-established traditions and seek opportunities to build fresh traditions, particularly at our newer campuses.

“There are numerous definitions of leadership, but John Quincy Adams is credited with one of my favorites: ‘If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader.'”

Regardless of when or which campus you attended as a UNG student, a common takeaway for our graduates is the university’s steadfast commitment to student success and leadership development. There are numerous definitions of leadership, but John Quincy Adams is credited with one of my favorites: “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

UNG is brimming with inspiring stories of student, faculty, staff, and alumni leadership – from the classroom to the field, in our communities locally and around the globe – that constitute the essence of our identity and mission. These stories celebrate our individual and collective determination, integrity, service, and pursuit of excellence. We strive to equip today’s students and graduates with these attributes, and I am honored to be part of an institution and community that values and exalts leadership development.

Thank you for your support of UNG and our students.

Sincerely,

Bonita C. Jacobs, Ph.D.
President