Category Archive: Libraries

Nov 02

GALILEO database: Artstor

This article is the third part of a series by UNG Libraries covering some of the newest and most exciting additions to our GALILEO Database collections. A new post will appear on the last Monday of every month of Academic year 2015-2016. Please note: login required for off-campus access to some links


Pictorial Quilt; Harriet Powers (1837-1910); United States; 1895-98; Textiles: Cotton plain weave, pieced, appliqued, embroidered, and quilted; 175 x 266.7 cm (68 7/8 x 105 in.

Pictorial Quilt; Harriet Powers (1837-1910); United States; 1895-98; Textiles: Cotton plain weave, pieced, appliqued, embroidered, and quilted; 175 x 266.7 cm (68 7/8 x 105 in.)  This image was provided by Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. All rights reserved. (see footnote)

“One picture is worth ten thousand words.

~ Chinese proverb

Images are powerful communication tools and the UNG Libraries subscribe to a fabulous collection, Artstor Digital Library. Artstor Digital Library shares almost 2 million images in the arts, architecture, humanities, and sciences from museums, photo archives, photographers, scholars, and artists for teaching and educational use.  Any UNG student, faculty, or staff member can immediately start searching and using images through the Libraries’ link to Artstor on campus. You can also opt to create an account to save and organize images into collections and write personal annotations. Faculty and staff may also request “instructor privileges” that allow additional folder rights and the ability to upload your personal images (Login, click My Profile, then click Instructor Privileges tab). The tools within Artstor allow you to easily export images directly into PowerPoint or use their offline presentation tool (OIV) to zoom in to see minute details of a work for presentations.

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Apples; Thomas Worthington Whittredge (1820-1910); United States; 1867; Oil on canvas; 38.73 x 30.8 cm (15 1/4 x 12 1/8 in.) This image was provided by Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. All rights reserved. (see footnote).

Looking for ideas on how to integrate images in your teaching? This collection is more than “fine art” to be used to teach Art History. Check out Artstor’s case studies and curriculum guides! You can find them at the Teaching Resources link under the Browse section in the Digital Library homepage. (If you’re visiting Artstor on your phone or tablet, you’ll find the case studies under Global Folders.) Artstor’s curriculum guides are broken down into topics or themes, each composed of approximately ten images that illustrate or support the subject. Artstor’s case studies describe the innovative ways subscribers in a variety of disciplines are using the Artstor Digital Library in their teaching, research, and scholarship.

Looking for images for your own publications? Select images in Artstor are part of the Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) program. Initiated by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2007 to help address the challenges of scholarly publishing in the digital age by providing free images for academic publications through an automated Web-based service, the Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) program makes available publication-quality images for use in scholarly publications free of charge. All IAP contributors are Artstor image contributors and you can use Artstor to search for IAP eligible images.

  1. Login to Artstor with your username and password
  2. Use the Keyword Search and add IAP to your search criteria.
  3. Click (the IAP icon) to download a high resolution file for publication. A new window will open explaining the process. If you are eligible for the program, click Proceed. In the next window, click Download.
  4. In the next window, review the IAP Terms and Conditions of Use. You may also print this window for reference with the print link at the end of the document. Check the box indicating that you have read and accept these terms before clicking Continue.
  5. Provide the information requested in the space provided. Click Download.
  6. Two windows will open. One warns this download will take some time. The other shows your computer’s directory, where you can choose a place to save this file and continue to download as usual.
CreatorMade by, Ma Yuan, Chinese, active ca. 1190-1225 Culture China Title Scholar Viewing a Waterfall; Guanpu tu Period Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279) Date late 12th-early 13th century Material Album leaf; ink and color on silk Measurements 9 7/8 x 10 1/4 in. (25.1 x 26 cm)

Scholar Viewing a Waterfall; Guanpu tu; Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279); late 12th-early 13th century; Album leaf; ink and color on silk This image was provided by The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved. (see footnote)

 

Want to learn more about Artstor? Artstor offers a webinar series that cover both the general usage and Artstor tools as well as subject specific sessions such as “More than Just Art: Image of Psychology” and “The Do’s and Don’ts of Image Copyright and Image Use”. Also, their support center has a wealth of learning aids in a variety of formats for just in time learning.

 


 

*All images provided are available for uses permitted under the ARTstor Terms and Conditions of Use, such as teaching and study, as well as for scholarly publications, through the Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) initiative. Please review the IAP Terms and Conditions of Use.

Sep 28

GALILEO Database: ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times™

This article is the second part of a series by UNG Libraries covering some of the newest and most exciting additions to our GALILEO Database collections. A new post will appear on the last Monday of every month of Academic year 2015-2016. Please note: login required for off-campus access to some links.

CTLL Blog - Hist NYT - Image

The ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times™ database offers researchers full coverage of the New York Times from 1851 to the recent past*. This invaluable resource provides a record of over 160 years of significant historical events. It also gives students and researchers a glimpse into changing social perspectives and values over the decades.

Teaching with this Database

The ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times™(listed in GALILEO as: Historical New York Times (via ProQuest)) database is a fantastic resource for primary sources in history. In addition to articles by staff writers, this database includes documents like satirical cartoons, letters to the editor, classifieds, and advertisements. History classes could read feature articles about significant historical events, then look at related cartoons, editorials, and letters to the editor to examine the social response to the historical event.

Sociology classes might use ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times™ to compare current and historical attitudes toward groups of people. For example, this 1904 classified ad page features job applicants openly discussing their own religion, ethnicity, physical appearance, and disabilities. This could spark a class discussion about whether these attributes are a factor in modern-day employment.
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Political science classes might use this database to examine the evolution of current hot-button political topics. The immigration debate didn’t originate with the 2016 Presidential election, after all! Students can search for “immigration” or “immigrant” within an assigned decade, then compare and contrast the issues discussed in historical articles versus current articles.

In the field of journalism and media studies, students might analyze how newspaper layouts have changed over the course of time. The “Browse this issue” feature shows an entire original page at a glance, including advertisements and images, and allows navigation to other pages within the issue. This retains all the original context and allows users to experience the newspaper much as the original reader would have.

Searching and Navigating

Like many databases, ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times™ can search through articles’ full text by keyword and narrow by publication date. Search refinements allow users to search for terms specifically within articles’ title, author, dateline, section, and more. Users can also search for a term anywhere outside of the article full text, which is helpful for common terms that appear frequently in irrelevant articles.

proquestsearchProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times™ can also search according to document type. Since this database offers full coverage, search results cover far more than just feature stories. Users can search for specific item types like advertisements, birth notices, classified ads, real estate transactions, obituaries, fire losses, soldier lists, and many more.

Some item types, including advertisements and comics, lack descriptive labels that would allow users to search for specific topics. Instead of keywords, you can select “advertisement” as the document type, select a date range of interest, and leave the keyword search box empty. This will bring back all advertisements from the specified date range.

Users can browse entire issues and experience them in their original layout. If you’re already reading an item in this database, click “Browse this issue” at the top or at the right of your page. If you’re starting from the Advanced Search page, click “Publications” and navigate to your desired issue based on its publication date.

For more tips on searching within this database, see this guide from ProQuest.

Expanding Beyond ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times™

Many more newspapers, both current and historical, are available through the UNG Libraries. Explore more current and historical newspapers through GALILEO, including the current New York Times.

 

*Coverage ends three years prior to the current year. Right now, coverage ends on December 31, 2012. Coverage of 2013 will become available in 2016.

Aug 31

GALILEO Database: History Reference Center

This article is the first part of a series by UNG Libraries covering some of the newest and most exciting additions to our GALILEO Database collections. A new post will appear on the last Monday of every month of Academic year 2015-2016.

A comprehensive and multi-faceted history database, History Reference Center® is an essential student resource for historical research with full-text journals, reference tools, and primary resources, all in one search.

History Reference Center® offers the full text of more than 2000 reference books, encyclopedias and non-fiction books from leading history publishers, and includes full text for articles from more than 150 leading history journals and periodicals combined with thousands of primary research documents.

Excellent as a “first stop” research tool for most topics in history, History Reference Center® results display basic overview sources alongside the texts of research documents.  The Browse by Topic feature lets students browse, refine and explore selected topics in either U.S. History or World History.  For many topics, the database includes related videos and images: over 80 hours of historical videos and 40,000 historical maps and images.

CivilrightsUsing History Reference Center® in the Classroom

Like other EBSCO databases, History Reference Center® offers all the basic features of an EBSCO resource including emailing, printing, citing, or saving, but there are still other features which help students explore and use content.

For instance, students may create a personal My EBSCOhost account which allows them to create customized folders to which they may permanently save their search results. EBSCO’s folder feature allows students to collect results from different searches, store them in the session folder, and manage the folder contents — printing, emailing, or saving them.  Folders created in one EBSCO database are visible in all EBSCO databases and remain accessible to the user indefinitely.

Additionally, the “shared folder” feature in the History Reference Center® database allows students and instructors to create and share their custom folders with others.  Shared folders make it is easy for students to share materials within the database for classroom projects and support the collaborative process as students work together in groups to search, review and save journal articles, reference materials and primary resources.  For more about using folders for any of the EBSCO databases, select the Help link at the top of the page of the database and Yaltasearch for “folders”.

As it has for many of its databases, EBSCO has created and offers to users a student “Scavenger Hunt” activity for the History Reference Center®.  By using the “Scavenger Hunt” for History Reference Center®  instructors help their students become familiar with the topics and content covered in the database, explore database features and create effective search strategies.

Creating Search Alerts

Instructors can keep the most up-to-date materials and resources for their classes handy by setting up an EBSCO search alert in the History Reference Center® database.  Search alerts locate relevant materials based on a prescribed topic without having to craft the search string over and over again. Once instructors set up a search alert, they will receive automatic notification by email whenever new search results become available. Instructors can also retrieve those alerts and search immediately, instead of waiting for the alert to run.   In the same way search alerts work, journal alerts can be set up to provide automatic email notifications whenever a new issue of a particular journal becomes available in the EBSCO database.  For more information about setting up journal or search alerts for any of the EBSCO databases, select the Help link at the top of the page of the database and search for “search alerts”.

For more information about History Reference Center® or any of the EBSCO databases in UNG Libraries’ collection, please call us at Gainesville, x3915, Dahlonega, x1889, Oconee, x6238, or Cumming x3840, or email UNG Libraries at askus@ung.edu. Students — and faculty — may also find the “Ask a Librarian” chat window on the UNG Libraries home page a useful tool for assistance finding resources and working through searches.

Mar 25

Faculty + Librarians: Collaborating for Student Learning

Similar to writing a research paper, conducting research is a cyclical process.  Many times, however, the research process consists of myriad baby steps with stops and starts that may or may not feel like progress. Thankfully, a variety of people are more than willing to assist the student along the research path. These partners in research–faculty, librarians, writing tutors–provide instructional assistance to the student at key moments in the research process. Deliberate and purposeful collaboration between these various people may help the student with both their research goals and the development of their information literacy skills.

At the most basic level, faculty members and librarians share the same goals and values of encouraging students to discover and evaluate information and create new knowledge during the process. Both parties have an opportunity and desire to teach information literacy skills because it benefits the students. With these shared goals, it makes sense for faculty and librarians to spend more time intentionally collaborating on approaches and strategies to information literacy instruction. A wonderful literature review by Mounce (2010) offers an array of methods and examples.

Collaboration between faculty and librarian already occurs during almost every planned library instruction session at UNG. Typically, a faculty member schedules a session with a librarian, discusses the basics of the assignment and any expectations, and then the librarian stops by during one class session and teaches the students. The students’ exposure to this information is vital to their research process and gives them an opportunity to contemplate and develop some of their information literacy skills. Many times the librarian ends the session by encouraging the students to set up a research consultation for additional assistance. After the session, the librarian waits for the student to contact them, and the faculty member simply hopes they reach out to the librarian, which creates a gap between library instruction and research assistance.

A more collaborative approach for faculty and librarian to address this gap is to offer additional in-class guided research sessions that purposefully bring the librarian back into the students’ research process. This additional contact would eliminate the gap or lack of research assistance that may occur between the face-to-face library instruction session and the submission of the final paper. For example, in two courses, English 1101 and 1102, I partnered with the professor to arrange an initial library instruction session covering the broader information literacy concepts,returning for a second, and possibly third, session to hold in-class guided research sessions. The guided research sessions allowed me to talk individually or with groups about specific topics, keywords, search issues, and more but also ensured that the students continued to talk about their research process before submitting their paper.

Since these collaborations take a great deal of time and effort to plan, faculty should reach out to librarians early in the process so that everyone can discuss expectations and options. Early and frequent communication is key.   Ideally, communication should start at the beginning of the semester so that faculty and librarian may discuss the assignment, expected student outcomes or goals, length of instruction sessions, expectations for all session content, as well as the amount of time either party can realistically devote to the process. Continued communication throughout the process not only supports the collaboration but allows both faculty and librarian to remain aware of student progress and struggles.

Second, trust and rapport are extremely important, but they also represent the most difficult conditions to establish since they take time. Many collaborative experiences develop over a number of years, and these relationships can be difficult to sustain given workloads and schedules. Working with faculty repeatedly, nevertheless, helps build rapport and a certain level of trust. With trust comes the ability to discuss the course assignment and content in greater depth, as well as the expectations of the students.

Even with a greater level of trust and communication, it is still important to recognize the natural boundaries, or defined roles, between faculty and librarian. In this particular model, librarians are not embedding themselves permanently in the course, either physically or online. Also, faculty are the content experts and have a broader view of their students’ strengths and weaknesses in relation to the content and will be the ones grading the student work. Librarians are the information literacy skill experts and can help students’ develop and put into practice their developing information literacy skills. I find it extremely important to remind myself and the students of these roles.

Wonderful opportunities exist for faculty and librarians to collaborate and enrich the academic and research experiences of our students. With good communication and extra planning, faculty and librarians can create a richer experience for students that will help them develop the information literacy skills necessary for success in today’s information environment.

References

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education | Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (n.d.). Retrieved March 3, 2015, from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework

Mounce, M. (2010). Working Together: Academic Librarians and Faculty Collaborating to Improve Students’ Information Literacy Skills: A Literature Review 2000-2009. Reference Librarian, 51(4), 300–320. doi:10.1080/02763877.2010.501420

Oct 29

UNG Libraries: Workshops to Support Faculty Scholarly Activity

UNG Libraries are offering ongoing sessions that support faculty in their scholarship and professional development.  Check out their workshops list.  They’re offering workshops on such things as bibliographic software and identifying the right journal for your scholarship (Identifying Publishers).  These are being held at all campuses.