Category Archive: Event

May 17

Research-Based Teaching Series 2016-2017

The Research-Based Teaching Series (RBTS) had its final workshop for the 2016-2017 academic year. Co-sponsored by the Department of English and the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership (CTLL), RBTS seeks to support the work of faculty from all disciplines, colleges, and campuses by offering faculty presentations and workshops on best practices in teaching and learning. These workshops not only provide information and resources for faculty seeking to enhance their own pedagogical practices, but also give faculty an opportunity to present their work to peers.

Because the University of North Georgia (UNG) is a partnering institution for the Association of American Colleges & Universities’ (AAC&U) Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP), we encouraged submissions that support the principles of this initiative. These included, but were not limited to, the following:

The 2016-2017 RBTS programming included five workshops offered to all campuses.

The 2017-2018 Call for Proposals is now available. Applicants can submit their proposal here.

Past RBTS Events 2016-2017:

September 7, 2016 – Literature is an Ally:  Reading War in the Classroom and Community

Kristin Kelly, Associate Professor of English, discussed “Talking Service,” a national reading and discussion program for servicemen and servicewomen coming back to civilian life from the war zone.

October 5, 2016 – Statistics: It’s Not Just for STEM Anymore! Conduct Research in ANY Discipline Using Statistical Analysis

Gina Reed, Professor of Math, led this workshop designed to support the research of all faculty and provided important methods and tools for conducting quantitative research in the classroom. This research can, potentially, develop into publishable scholarship in the areas of teaching and learning.

January 18, 2017 – Everyone Can Teach Writing: Three Constructs to Engage Students in Deep Learning

Jim Shimkus, Assistant Professor of English and Director of Faculty Fellows, and Anita Turlington, Associate Professor of English, explained the relevance of the three constructs (and associated practices/activities) that engage students in learning beyond a simple quantity of writing (i.e. number of pages written) as high-impact teaching practices that help to enhance student learning and development. Their presentation used results from a recent research project, “The Contributions of Writing to Learning and Development: Results from a Large-Scale Multi-institutional Study” which identified the three constructs as Interactive Writing Processes, Meaning-Making Writing Tasks, and Clear Writing Expectations. These practices are helpful not only for those college teachers who are focused on teaching writing, but teachers in any discipline who are interested in strategies to enhance student learning.

Molly Daniel, Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and Composition, presenting at the Effectively Responding to Student Writing workshop.

February 1, 2017 – Effectively Responding to Student Writing

Matthew Boedy and Molly Daniel, Assistant Professors of English, shared principles for giving effective feedback. These principles are grounded in composition theory but also includes particular strategies, practices, and “marks” by instructors. Many in the English Department teach First Year Composition on a regular basis, but faculty in other departments also teach writing-intensive courses. Much research in composition theory has been devoted to developing best practices for giving feedback to students in these types of courses.

March 27, 2017 – Is Blended Learning a Viable Option?

Jennifer Schneider, Assistant Professor of Accounting, addressed how to use an interactive approach to reach students. Educators and students are interested in positive learning experiences. Making the change to a blended learning structure might achieve the goal for both groups. “Flipping the Classroom” is a blended learning method that is being used to disrupt the passive learning pedagogy.

May 17

USG Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Fellows 2017-2018 Program

The second cohort of the University System of Georgia (USG) Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Fellows had their orientation at the USG Teaching and Learning Conference in Athens, Georgia, on April 5-7, 2017.

The USG established the SoTL Fellows to foster and support a learning community whose members plan and develop classroom-based research projects.

Mary Carney, Director of UNG’s Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership (CTLL), currently serves as the co-director, and Laura Ng, Interim Assistant Dean at the Oconee campus, was selected for the inaugural cohort of 2016-2017. Up to ten Fellows are chosen each year system-wide to advance SoTL work that will enhance the larger teaching and learning community, both within and without the University System.

During the initial meeting, the Fellows attended presentations by Rebecca Rose, the Head Librarian at the Cumming campus who also serves as the USG SoTL Fellows embedded librarian. The guiding concept for the 2017-2018 cohort will be AAC&U’s LEAP initiative. Over the course of the academic year the Fellows will meet as they design, develop, and implement their SoTL research projects.

For more information about the USG SoTL Fellows program, contact the co-directors: Denise Domizi at denise.domizi@ung.edu or Mary Carney at mary.carney@ung.edu.

Apr 25

UNG at the 2017 USG Teaching and Learning Conference

On April 5-7, 2017, the University System of Georgia (USG) hosted the USG Teaching and Learning Conference at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education in Athens, Georgia. Faculty, staff, and students gathered to share their research, experiences, and other work related to Best Practices for Promoting Engaged Student Learning. Irene Kokkala, Director of Distance Education & Technology Integration (DETI), is a founding co-director of this system-wide conference.

The University of North Georgia (UNG) was well-represented with forty-five UNG faculty, staff, and students chosen to present their work at the conference. Their presentations highlight UNG’s commitment to academic excellence and contribute to the teaching and learning communities of UNG and USG.

The following faculty and staff presented their work at the 2017 USG Teaching and Learning Conference:

“A Tale of Two Labs: Adapting Field Biology Labs into Online Formats”
Eleanor Schut

“Addressing STEM Undergraduate Deficiencies Reading and Writing Scientific Literature Using a Learning Community”
Evan Lampert and Steve Pearson

“An Integrated First-Year Cohort Experience”
Tom Cooper, Alison Hite, Phillip Mitchell, Nathan Price, and Robert H. Scott

“Biology Boot Camp: A Peer-Assisted, Active Learning Program Designed to Increase Student Engagement and Promote Critical Thinking in Biology”
Cathy Whiting

“Building Meaningful Bridges: Innovative Approaches to Learning Communities”
Rosaria Meek, Lance Bardsley, Dan Cabaniss, and Michael Kemling

“Cheating on Online Exams: How to Recognize, Foil, and Prevent It”
Margaret Williamson, Katherine Kipp, and John Williams

“Conditional Feedback: Using Google Drive to Encourage Revision Effort”
Matthew Horton

“Empowering Faculty, Staff, and Students: Applying Growth Mindset to Writing Instruction”
Diana Edelman and Jim Shimkus

“Engage Me! Free or Low-cost Web-based Technology to Interact and Engage Students in Your Classroom and online Courses”
Jim Wilkison and Ching-Yu Huang

“Excel Spreadsheets as a Tool for Teaching and Learning Quantitative Courses Online”
Christine Jonick

“False Assumptions: the Challenges and Politics of Teaching in China”
Laura Getty

“Heightened Critical Thinking: Requiring a Prospectus and Annotated Bibliography in the Research Paper Process”
Donna Gessell

“Ideological Exploration: Responses to Zakaria’s In Defense of a Liberal Education”
Tanya Bennett

“Implementation of a Biology Resource Center” (Cancelled)
Jeanelle Morgan

“Innovative Publishing: Developing Low- and No-Cost Textbooks with UNG Press”
Bonnie Robinson and Corey Parson

“Learning to Talk/Talking to Learn: Using Critical Dialogue to Promote Critical Thinking Learning Communities”
Patrice Prince with students, Chelsea Belezaire, Alexis Schubiger, and Sarah Williams

“Problem-Solving in the Literature Classroom: Creative Responses to Literary Texts”
Leigh Dillard and Macklin Cowart with student, Callie Bryant

“Research Tools for SoTL”
Rebecca Rose

“Spark and Sway”
John Williams

“SoTL Communities of Practice for Research on Teaching and Learning”
Mary Carney and Laura Ng

“The Process of Building OER Materials that Promote Student Engagement” (Listed in email from Marie Lasseter)
Patty Wagner

“The Research Consultation: Teaching Students Critical Thinking Skills Outside of the Classroom”
Virginia Feher, Sean Boyle, Randall Parish, and Karen Redding

“Using a Collaborative Laboratory Exercise to Connect Different Sub-disciplines of Biology”
Swapna Bhat and Evan Lampert

“Yelling Whitman: Teaching Prosody by Performance”
Samuel Prestridge, Esther Morgan-Ellis, and Laura Ng

Nov 13

UNG Faculty Academies for 2014

Faculty Academies

We invite faculty and teaching staff to apply for one or more of the UNG Faculty Academies.  These programs provide a sustained professional development opportunity and, when successfully completed, a certificate to mark this accomplishment. The three Academies for 2014 will focus on:

  1. Grant Writing
  2. High-Impact Educational Practices
  3. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

These academies run on the calendar year, beginning in January 2014.  Individuals and research teams are invited to apply. The Academies will involve a combination of workshops, online exchanges in D2L, and day-long retreats to explore topics in depth.

Application Deadline for GrantsMonday, December 2, 2013
Application Deadline for High-Impact Practices and for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Friday, December 6, 2013.
For applications and further information, please see the CTLL Web site.

Grants
This Academy will help participants identify targeted funding sources. They will be guided through a concept paper/proposal with support and feedback by peers and professional staff. The Grants Academy will result in a competitive concept paper or full proposal to support faculty participants’ projects. Prior grant experience is not a pre-requisite. All levels of experience are welcome.

High-Impact Educational Practices (HIPs)
The HIP Academy will offer participants a shared community in which to study and implement research-based educational practices. This Academy will offer a methodical approach to re-visioning courses and assignments in order to implement and/or refine high-impact educational experiences in courses. We will offer enhanced focus on three practices in particular:

  1. Diversity/Global Learning
  2. Service-Learning
  3. Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities

HIP Participants will

  • Gain community and support for implementing and/or refining high-impact practices (HIPs) through workshops and peer sharing
  • Examine and discuss the theoretical and applied features of particular high-impact practices
  • Participate in workshops, retreats, roundtables, and mentoring for deep learning on chosen high-impact practices and implementation of a HIP project
  • Implement backward course design to re-vision learning outcomes and the practices used to achieve these
  • Expand their knowledge of classroom assessment techniques (CAT)

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
The SoTL Academy grows out of a Presidential Innovation Award and will offer participants a shared community and structured approach to learning about SoTL. Each person or team will develop or refine a research question on an instructional topic of her choosing.  The Academy will offer a guided process of identifying a theoretical frame, gathering evidence, analyzing findings, and preparing for presentation or publication.

SoTL participants will

  • Attend workshops, retreats, roundtables, and mentoring for deep learning on SoTL, implementation of a SoTL project, and dissemination of findings
  • Interact with SoTL scholars
  • Participate in SoTL faculty writing group
  • Learn more strategies for classroom assessment techniques (CAT)

The co-directors, Dr. Mary Carney and Dr. Laura Ng, wish to express their thanks for the Presidential Innovation Award that will partially fund this Academy.

For the HIP and SoTL Academies, please submit the online form and upload curriculum vitae, statement of teaching philosophy, and a statement of interest. These Academies are limited to full-time faculty and teaching staff. Further information about the application requirement can be found at the CTLL site.  The application form for the Grants Academy can be found on the CTLL site.

 

Nov 07

Introduction: Federal Grant Writing Tips and Tricks Webinar

Get a personal introduction to federal grant writing with discussions that will focus on resources, tips & tricks for strong applications and proposal analysis from the grant maker’s perspective.  The content of the event will be developed based on the Research Interest Form completed by each participant prior to the session. This information will be used as examples during the discussion.

Presented by: The Georgia Digital Innovation Group

Facilitated by: Robin S. Lewis, CRA | Director, Office of Grants & Sponsored Projects |
Georgia College & State University
November 18, 2013
2:00 – 4:00 pm

CTLL will pay the $50 connection fee and offer viewing at these locations:

Cumming: University Center, Room 246
Dahlonega: Stewart Center, Room 260
Gainesville: Dunlap Mathis, Room 137
Oconee: Student Resource Center, Room 564

Please RSVP by Friday, November 8, 2013
If you are interested in signing up for the webinar above, please register here.  Or, send the name of the workshop and the campus on which you will attend to: rsvp.ctll@ung.edu.

Oct 29

Society for the Teaching of Psychology e-Conference: Teaching Competencies

Teaching Competencies

Society for the Teaching of Psychology e-Conference
Co-sponsored by the University of North Georgia’s Distance Education & Technology Integration
Friday, January 24, 2014
10:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Eastern Standard Time)

The Society for the Teaching of Psychology presents the 7th Annual Live e-Conference. The 2014 teaching conference will include topics such as (1) how do you know if you are a good teacher?; (2) how to elevate your teaching to standards of excellence; (3) a comprehensive operational definition of model teachers (4) evidence based practices for evaluating instructors; (5) student-centered syllabi design; (6) using and conducting SoTL in the classroom; and (7) how to align your teaching with APA guidelines.

Only Internet access is required to watch (and hear) the presenters; you will be able to test your connection before the conference. Registered participants will receive access instructions and passwords approximately one week prior to the broadcast. For additional information, contact Steven Lloyd (steven.lloyd@ung.edu) at 706-864-1445 or Enes Aganovic (enes.aganovic@ung.edu) at 706-867-3513.

e-Conference Program (all listed times are Eastern Standard Time)

9:30-9:45 am Logon to recheck your internet connection at your convenience
9:45-10:00 am Opening remarks: Welcome and Introductions

10:00-11:00 am Climbing the Teaching Hierarchy: Aspirational Benchmarks for Quality Teaching
Regan A. R. Gurung, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

11:00-12:00 pm Beyond Competency: Striving For Mastery In Your Teaching
William Buskist, Auburn University

12:00-12:30 pm An Introduction to the Characteristics of Model Psychology Teachers
Guy Boysen, McKendree University

12:30-1:00 pm Evidence Based Practices for Evaluating Instructors
Jared Keeley, Mississippi State University

1:00-1:30 pm It Starts With the Syllabus: A Primer for Constructing Student-Centered Syllabi
Aaron Richmond, Metropolitan State University of Denver

1:30-2:00 pm SoTL Knowledge in the Classroom: Applying and Creating Research
Janie Wilson, Georgia Southern University

2:00-2:30 pm Strategies for Addressing the Revised APA Guidelines for the Psychology Major
Michael Stoloff, James Madison University

2:30-2:45 pm Closing remarks: Acknowledgements

Thank you to the University of North Georgia’s Division of Distance Education and Technology Integration for producing and broadcasting the e-Conference. If you have technology-related questions, please contact Enes Aganovic (enes.aganovic@ung.edu; 706.867.3513) or Steven Lloyd (steven.lloyd@ung.edu; 706.864.1445).

Registration Fees

  • Individual Registration: $20
  • Institutional Registration: $50 (unlimited access for all faculty at an institution)

Registration Process

Register and pay for the conference

If needed, you may mail a check or purchase order payable to the Society for the Teaching of Psychology, with a note specifying who the payment is for, to:

  • David Kreiner, STP Treasurer
    Department of Psychological Science, Lovinger 1111
    University of Central Missouri
    Warrensburg, MO 64093
    Email: kreiner@ucmo.edu

Oct 29

Approaches to Reducing Plagiarism and Fostering Academic Integrity Workshops

Approaches to Reducing Plagiarism and Fostering Academic Integrity Workshops

Learn about UNG policies, shared resources, and approaches to handling and reducing plagiarism in your classes. Faculty will have a chance to talk with Deans of Students or their representatives about Code of Conduct policies related to plagiarism and other academic infractions. Refreshments Served.

Approaches to Reducing Plagiarism and Fostering Academic Integrity
Friday, November 15, 2013
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Location: Oconee Campus – Student Resource Center, Room 522
Facilitators: Michelle Brown, Assistant VP for Student Affairs & Dean of Students; Angela Megaw, Oconee Head Librarian; Karen Redding, Assistant Professor of English, Faculty Fellow of Center for Teaching, Learning and Leadership; Mary Carney, Director of Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership

Approaches to Reducing Plagiarism and Fostering Academic Integrity
Monday, November 18, 2013
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Location: Gainesville Campus – Nesbitt, 3110 B
Facilitators: Tanya Bennett, Professor of English;  Cara Ray, Associate VP for Student Affairs & Dean of Students; Rebecca Rose, Cumming Head Librarian; Mary Carney, Director of Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership

Approaches to Reducing Plagiarism and Fostering Academic Integrity
Tuesday, November 19, 2013
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Location: Dahlonega Campus – Library Technology Center, Room 163
Facilitators: Tanya Bennett, Professor of English; David Marling, Assistant Dean of Students; Barbara Petersohn, Associate Professor of Library Science; Mary Carney, Director of Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership