Category Archive: Conferences

Dec 01

Pretending to be a student reminds me how to teach.

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Every summer, the Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction at the University of Kansas presents the Intensive Institute on the Study of Science Fiction, a two week seminar covering a list of either 25 novels or a selection of short stories, all deemed “important” to the genre. The seminar begins with the early works, the classics, and moves through the Science Fiction Golden Age, all the way through our contemporary era. The instructor, Chris McKitterick, is a published novelist, has studied astronomy, and has also worked as a technical writer for the gaming and tech industries . He knows his technology and his literature, and was, therefore, the perfect person to take over for the founder and former director, SF guru James Gunn. (I will freely admit that I was pretty starstruck when I met Gunn, my intellectual and academic hero, at a casual lunch with some of the students. To my credit, I did not squeal. Not out loud, anyway).

So it was that, in June of 2014, I spent two weeks studying the classics. From War of the Worlds to Consider Phlebas, a group of seven students deconstructed history, debated politics, conducted thought experiments, and examined imaginary (potential) technologies. For over four hours a day, every day, we talked about books. Books we’d loved for years; books we finished reading only on principle; books we’d heard of and had planned to read anyway; books that shattered everything we thought we knew about narrative/philosophy/genre/[fill-in-the-blank]. In a word, it was good.

In another word, it was nostalgic. Remember those grad school classes where everyone showed up, energized by the readings and ready for lively discussion? It was like that. We see it happen in our own classrooms: those days that we talk about later with our colleagues, friends, partners, those in-class activities we hope to remember to repeat to similar success in a future semester. Those days when we remember that the symbiosis of teaching and learning can be exhilarating, that it can feel like truth, that it can change lives…including our own. That’s what I felt during this course, and that’s what I want my students to feel as often as possible.

I had been eyeing this program for several years, but the expense of the travel, particularly the lodging and airfare, put it out of reach. Until I received the second reminder from CTLL about the Presidential Faculty Professional Engagement Award (PFPE). According to the award information, “Funding is designed to support professional development activities for faculty to remain state-of-the-art in their disciplines.” I could argue that teaching SF is “state-of-the-art,” especially when dealing with the so-called “millennials.” Maybe, just maybe, I could do this.

Perhaps you’re not daunted by the application process for faculty or staff awards. Perhaps you don’t suffer from “imposter syndrome,” the symptoms of which usually reach a peak in graduate school, but often linger for years after one has obtained a good position in higher ed. Perhaps you’re that person: self-assured, always successful, never nervous.

I, however, am not.

When I learned of the PFPE, I resisted applying right away. I had all of usual my wimpy excuses at the ready:

  • I’m still the new kid. (I’ve been here since 2006.)
  • I don’t have time to prepare a proposal. (Who does?)
  • Who would write a recommendation for me? (Just ask someone.)
  • Other faculty deserve it more than I do. (Shouldn’t that be the judges’ decision?)

This time, however, my desire to attend an academic geek-fest a professional development seminar managed to out-shout the self-defeating voices in my head, and I gave it a whirl. If I didn’t succeed, I reasoned, I could always consider the process an important learning experience for my career. I was right, too: I’m nearly certain that, if I hadn’t applied this time, future opportunities would grow less appealing, and the reminder emails from CTLL would more quickly vanish into my deleted items folder. I learned to prepare a (small) budget, found the words to articulate my professional goals, and challenged myself to plan for future collaboration and presentation to my colleagues.

Plus: I got to spend nearly two weeks with some very smart SF scholar / teacher talking philosophy, science, religion, and literature. Definitely worth every moment of anxiety and increased workload.

So, my advice is this: if you see an opportunity to reignite your passion for your calling, whether that calling is teaching, like me, or scholarly activity, take it. Not profound or surprising advice, but, sometimes, we all need a little kick in the pants to do what, in the end, we really want to do.

On a final, more practical note: UNG faculty & staff should also attend this presentation: Writing a Successful Faculty Scholar Award Proposal on December 3. It’s easy to be passionate; it’s less easy to find the funds to follow that passion.  (Presented by CTLL)  Be sure to RSVP.

Resources

CTLL Faculty Awards: http://ung.edu/center-teaching-learning-leadership/awards/index.php

Academic Affairs Faculty Awards: http://ung.edu/academic-affairs/faculty-awards/index.php#UNG%20Faculty%20Awards%20&%20Ceremonies

Oct 29

Conference on Applied Learning in Higher Education (CALHE)

Missouri Western State University is pleased to host the 9th Annual Conference on Applied Learning in Higher Education (CALHE) March 20-22, 2014.

There is one week left before the November 1st deadline to submit a proposal for a talk, workshop, or poster.

This year invited speakers will focus on institutionalizing service learning, getting funding for undergraduate research, and the CUR document on Characteristics of Excellence in Undergraduate Research.

Please see http://www.missouriwestern.edu/appliedlearning/conference/Callforpapers14.pdf for the call for papers and http://www.missouriwestern.edu/appliedlearning/conference for information about the conference.

Oct 29

Society for the Teaching of Psychology e-Conference: Teaching Competencies

Teaching Competencies

Society for the Teaching of Psychology e-Conference
Co-sponsored by the University of North Georgia’s Distance Education & Technology Integration
Friday, January 24, 2014
10:00 AM – 3:00 PM (Eastern Standard Time)

The Society for the Teaching of Psychology presents the 7th Annual Live e-Conference. The 2014 teaching conference will include topics such as (1) how do you know if you are a good teacher?; (2) how to elevate your teaching to standards of excellence; (3) a comprehensive operational definition of model teachers (4) evidence based practices for evaluating instructors; (5) student-centered syllabi design; (6) using and conducting SoTL in the classroom; and (7) how to align your teaching with APA guidelines.

Only Internet access is required to watch (and hear) the presenters; you will be able to test your connection before the conference. Registered participants will receive access instructions and passwords approximately one week prior to the broadcast. For additional information, contact Steven Lloyd (steven.lloyd@ung.edu) at 706-864-1445 or Enes Aganovic (enes.aganovic@ung.edu) at 706-867-3513.

e-Conference Program (all listed times are Eastern Standard Time)

9:30-9:45 am Logon to recheck your internet connection at your convenience
9:45-10:00 am Opening remarks: Welcome and Introductions

10:00-11:00 am Climbing the Teaching Hierarchy: Aspirational Benchmarks for Quality Teaching
Regan A. R. Gurung, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

11:00-12:00 pm Beyond Competency: Striving For Mastery In Your Teaching
William Buskist, Auburn University

12:00-12:30 pm An Introduction to the Characteristics of Model Psychology Teachers
Guy Boysen, McKendree University

12:30-1:00 pm Evidence Based Practices for Evaluating Instructors
Jared Keeley, Mississippi State University

1:00-1:30 pm It Starts With the Syllabus: A Primer for Constructing Student-Centered Syllabi
Aaron Richmond, Metropolitan State University of Denver

1:30-2:00 pm SoTL Knowledge in the Classroom: Applying and Creating Research
Janie Wilson, Georgia Southern University

2:00-2:30 pm Strategies for Addressing the Revised APA Guidelines for the Psychology Major
Michael Stoloff, James Madison University

2:30-2:45 pm Closing remarks: Acknowledgements

Thank you to the University of North Georgia’s Division of Distance Education and Technology Integration for producing and broadcasting the e-Conference. If you have technology-related questions, please contact Enes Aganovic (enes.aganovic@ung.edu; 706.867.3513) or Steven Lloyd (steven.lloyd@ung.edu; 706.864.1445).

Registration Fees

  • Individual Registration: $20
  • Institutional Registration: $50 (unlimited access for all faculty at an institution)

Registration Process

Register and pay for the conference

If needed, you may mail a check or purchase order payable to the Society for the Teaching of Psychology, with a note specifying who the payment is for, to:

  • David Kreiner, STP Treasurer
    Department of Psychological Science, Lovinger 1111
    University of Central Missouri
    Warrensburg, MO 64093
    Email: kreiner@ucmo.edu

Oct 29

CTLL Upcoming Workshops

For “At Your Desk” (online) workshops, see the offerings from the University System of Georgia (USG) Faculty Development Monthly Series Workshops.

The UNG Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership (CTLL) offers a wide variety of services focused on faculty development. You can find the latest list of upcoming workshops, conferences, events, and other faculty development information on the Notice Board (NB). While at the Notice Board, be sure to register for the daily digest of Notices.

To sign up for one of the workshops below, please register here. Or, send the name of the workshop and the campus on which you will attend to: rsvp.ctll@ung.edu. No RSVP required on sessions named “drop-in.”

UNG Faculty and Staff Awards Ceremony (Gainesville)
Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitators: Bonita Jacobs, President
Patricia Donat, Provost/Senior VP for Academic Affairs
Location: Gainesville Campus – Continuing Education Building, Room 108

Grants Brown Bag Q&A
Thursday, November 7, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitator: Judith Brauer, Proposal Developer
Location: Dahlonega Campus – Library Technology Center, Room 162

Identifying Potential Publishers for Your Work
Thursday, November 7, 2013, 2:00 pm – 2:50 pm
Facilitator: Julie Higbee, Liaison Librarian & Digital Commons
Location: Dahlonega Campus – Library Technology Center, Room 163

Identifying Potential Publishers for Your Work
Friday, November 8, 2013, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Facilitator: Rebecca Rose, Head Librarian
Location: Cumming Campus – Room 152

Identifying Potential Publishers for Your Work
Friday, November 8, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitator: Angela Megaw, Head Librarian
Location: Oconee Campus – Classroom 302

UNG Faculty and Staff Awards Ceremony (Dahlonega)
Monday, November 11, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitators: Bonita Jacobs, President
Patricia Donat, Provost/Senior VP for Academic Affairs
Location: Dahlonega Campus – Hoag Auditorium

Identifying Potential Publishers for Your Work
Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitator: Amanda Nash, Head Librarian
Emily Thornton, Public Services Librarian
Location: Gainesville Campus – Library, Room 221

Grants Brown Bag Q&A
Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitator: Judith Brauer, Proposal Developer
Location: Gainesville Campus – Dunlap Mathis, Room 137

SafeZone Training
Thursday, November 14, 2013, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Facilitator: Georgia Safe Schools Coalition
Location: Gainesville Campus – Robinson Ballroom, ABCDE

Approaches to Reducing Plagiarism, and Fostering Academic Integrity
Friday, November 15, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitator: Michelle Brown, Assistant VP for Student Affairs & Dean of Students; Angela Megaw, Oconne Head Librarian; Karen Redding, Assistant Professor of English, Faculty Fellow of Center for Teaching, Learning and Leadership; Mary Carney, Director of Center for Teaching, Learning and Leadership
Location: Oconee Campus – Student Resource Center, Room 522

SafeZone Training
Friday, November 15, 2013, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Facilitator: Georgia Safe Schools Coalition
Location: Oconee Campus – Student Resource Center, Room 530

Approaches to Reducing Plagiarism, and Fostering Academic Integrity
Monday, November 18, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitator: Tanya Bennett, Professor of English; Cara Ray, Associate VP for Student Affairs & Dean of Students; Rebecca Rose, Cumming Head Librarian; Mary Carney, Director of Center for Teaching, Learning and Leadership
Location: Gainesville Campus – Nesbitt, 3110 B

USG Introduction Federal Grant Writing Tips and Tricks
Monday, November 18, 2013, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Facilitator: Robin S. Lewis, CRA
Location: Cumming Campus – University Venter, Room 246
Dahlonega Campus – Student Center, Room 260
Gainesville Campus – Dunlap Mathis, Room 137
Oconee Campus – TBA

Approaches to Reducing Plagiarism, and Fostering Academic Integrity
Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitators: Tanya Bennett, Professor of English; David Marling, Assistant Dean of Students; Barbara Petersohn, Associate Professor of Library Science; Mary Carney, Director of Center for Teaching, Learning and Leadership
Location: Dahlonega Campus – Library Technology Center, Room 163

Grants Brown Bag Q&A
Thursday, November 21, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitator: Judith Brauer, Proposal Developer
Location: Oconee Campus – Student Resource Center, Room 564

Faculty Scholar Brown Bag Seminar
Friday, November 22, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Facilitators: Maryellen Cosgrove, Associate Provost
Janice Crook-Hill, Assistant Professor of Biology
Tony Zschau, Assistant Professor of Sociology
Daniel Hatch, Associate Professor of Psychological Science
Location: Cumming Campus – University Center, Room 262
Dahlonega Campus – Library Technology Center, Room 163
Gainesville Campus – Dunlap Mathis, Room 137
Oconee Campus – Student Resource Center, Room 564

First Fridays:  From Academic Advising
Q&A Drop-In Session
Friday, December 6, 2013, 9:00 am – 11:00 am
Facilitator: Carolyn Simons, Academic Advisor
Location: Gainesville Campus – Science Building, Room 257

External Conferences and Workshops
CTLL makes announcements about selected teaching and learning conferences on UNG Notice Board:  https://my.ung.edu/facstaff/Lists/Notice%20Board/allitems.aspx.

Check out the USG Faculty Development Monthly Series Workshops (conducted online) at http://www.usg.edu/facultyresources/faculty_development/workshops/category/academic_year_2013_2014

See also USG Faculty Resources, Conferences Page: http://www.usg.edu/facultyresources/resources/conferences

ISSOTL 2013 (International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning)
October 2 – 5, 2013
Archived sessions are available in the program of this conference: http://www.issotl13.com/

PKAL Atlanta Regional Network 2013 Fall Meeting: Tech in Teaching
October 14, 2013
Georgia Institute of Technology
Atlanta, Georgia
http://www.aacu.org/pkal/regionalnetworks/atlanta2013fallmeeting.cfm

International Association for Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement Conference
November 6 – 8, 2013
Omaha, NE
http://www.researchslce.org/conferences/

2014 Gulf-South Summit on Service-Learning and Civic Engagement through Higher Education
March 26 – 28, 2014
Auburn, Alabama
http://www.gulfsouthsummit.org/geninfo.htm

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) provides links to a wide variety of NEH Funded projects, including EDSITEment: The Best of Humanities on the Web, Freedom Riders, The Great Gatsby, The Papers of Benjamin Franklin, and The Writing Code.

National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) offers a variety of podcasts, webcasts, and webinars. 

Oct 23

7th annual SoTL Commons Conference in Savannah — Call for Papers

The submission period for the 7th annual SoTL Commons Conference is open till December 1, 2013. Information on submitting proposals and registration is available at http://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/sotlcommons

All proposals will go through a blind, peer-review process by the SoTL Commons Review Board consisting of faculty located at various colleges and universities around the world who are knowledgeable about the scholarship of teaching and learning.

The 7th annual SoTL Commons Conference will be held March 26-28, 2014 in Savannah, Georgia (USA).  The conference brings together people engaging in SoTL and anyone wanting to improve student learning outcomes in higher education today. The conference epitomizes that college teaching is intellectual work that is enhanced both by disciplinary scholarship and the scholarship on teaching the disciplines.

Please contact the Conference Program Chair, Dr. Diana Sturges, at sotlcommons@georgiasouthern.edu with any questions.

 

 

Sep 13

Project Zero Perspectives: How and Where Does Learning Thrive?

Project Zero Perspectives: How and Where Does Learning Thrive?
February 13-15, 2014
Memphis, TN

Here’s a conference in Memphis that focuses on international education.  From their description:

Founded in 1967 and recognized as one of the world’s leading professional development programs for educators, Project Zero, in conjunction with the Center for the Advancement and Study of International Education (CASIE), will bring internationally-renowned researchers to a conference co-hosted by the Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence on the campus of Presbyterian Day School in Memphis. CASIE has partnered with Project Zero over the past four years to bring financially accessible and highest-quality professional development conferences to select cities around the world. The Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence is a partnership between Presbyterian Day School (PDS) and the University of Memphis whose purpose is to provide world-class professional development to educators at all types of schools. The Martin Institute is housed on the PDS campus.

Educators from around the world are invited to learn from Project Zero researchers and practitioners. The Project Zero team includes some of the world’s leading researchers, writers, thinkers and leaders in the field of teaching and learning. Their work includes investigations into the nature of intelligence, understanding, thinking, creativity, ethics and other essential aspects of human learning. The professional learning from Harvard’s Project Zero has proven to be transformational for teachers and has direct, practical and powerful application in the classroom.

With its theme and overarching question of How & Where Does Learning Thrive? the conference will invite educators to reflect deeply on how they design and facilitate learning for their students.

See Project Zero’s site for more information.

Sep 13

Teaching and Learning Conferences

For a robust listing of conferences, see these compilations:

  1. Kennesaw’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning: Teaching Conferences Directory
  2. ELON’s Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning: Teaching Conferences

You may also find these teaching and learning confernces of interest:

ISSOTL 2013 (International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning)
October 2 – 5, 2013
Raleigh, North Carolin
http://www.issotl13.com/

PKAL Atlanta Regional Network 2013 Fall Meeting: Tech in Teaching
October 14, 2013
Georgia Institute of Technology
Atlanta, Georgia

International Association for Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement Conference
November 6 – 8, 2013
Omaha, NE

 

Sep 13

Transforming STEM Education: Inquiry, Innovation, Inclusion, and Evidence

From the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U)

Transforming STEM Education: Inquiry, Innovation, Inclusion, and Evidence

A Network for Academic Renewal Conference October 31–November 2, 2013 San Diego, California Register by September 26 for best conference rates.

Transforming STEM Education: Inquiry, Innovation, Inclusion, and Evidence will bring together forward-thinking STEM faculty and academic leaders from all sectors of higher education to share innovations, evidence, and practical strategies for succeeding in the dual STEM challenges of this era:

  • Reversing the dramatic U.S. loss of needed talent in STEM disciplines, using evidence-based practices that increase persistence and achievement for all students, with particular attention to students from underrepresented groups;
  • Ensuring that all STEM graduates build—from the outset of their studies—the multi-disciplinary knowledge, research skills, and mindsets needed to address the complex challenges to be faced in every sphere of society.

This STEM conference is organized by Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL), a catalyst for STEM education reform and inclusive excellence and the STEM leadership center within AAC&U.

Sep 07

Overview of the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership Mission and Goals

Welcome to the blog for the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership (CTLL).  We support the University of North Georgia’s commitment to “academic excellence in a student-focused environment.”  Through our programs and outreach, CTLL seeks to foster our community of scholar teachers as they pursue research-based experimentation in the design and implementation significant educational experiences.CTLL programs enhance teaching excellence, instructional innovation, the scholarship of teaching and learning, effective academic leadership, and enriched educational environments through such opportunities as service-learning. CTLL encourages, recognizes, and rewards demonstrated excellence in teaching.

The goals of the CTLL are:

  1. to facilitate faculty dialogue related to effective teaching practices and to the development of partnerships within and across disciplines and academic institutions
  2. to provide on-going training and support in the development, review, and implementation of teaching methods, assessment practices, and curricular innovation
  3. to maintain a collection of teaching resources including current professional literature, and videos
  4. to disseminate information about professional development opportunities, materials, and grants through a variety of media
  5. to coordinate New Faculty Orientation, the New Faculty Institute, and a mentoring program
  6. to assist in addressing institutional issues and problems affecting the teaching-learning climate
  7. to serve as an advocate for teaching-related academic initiatives
  8. to support the development of faculty making the transition to academic leadership roles